Sections

Weekend Reads: Booksellers give us their recommendations

Brooklyn Paper
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:

Word’s picks: “Hard to Do” by Kelli Maria Korducki

Kelli Maria Korducki’s book, subtitled “The Surprising Feminist History of Breaking Up” is a knowledge bomb for anyone living in a fantasy world where politics and relationships have not always been intertwined. And this knowledge bomb comes in a delightfully small package. She analyzes women’s economic and ritualistic domestic partnerships, including pop culture characters and members of the British monarchy, with the searing gaze of a philosopher holding nothing back. Korducki brings the strength and radical act of choosing to break up to light.

— Hannah Oliver Depp, Word [126 Franklin St. at Milton Street in Greenpoint, (718) 383–0096, www.wordbookstores.com].

Community Bookstore’s pick: “Some Trick” by Helen DeWitt

From the author of the under-read masterpiece “The Last Samurai” comes a collection of 13 stories that survey the absurdities that arise when the life of the mind collides with the runaway train of commerce. Whether in the art world, academia, publishing, or public stock offerings, every earnest attempt to follow one’s muse into the labyrinthine kingdom of the dollar is brought low in unexpected, and often hilarious, fashion.

— Samuel Partal, Community Bookstore [43 Seventh Ave. between Carroll Street and Garfield Place in Park Slope, (718) 783–3075, www.communitybookstore.net].

Greenlight Bookstore’s pick: “Less” by Andrew Sean Greer

In Greer’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, now available in paperback, self-proclaimed “middling” author Arthur Less travels the world in an attempt to outrun reminders of failed relationships and his approaching 50th birthday. Dodging a former lover’s ex-wife at a conference in Mexico City, accepting his very first literary prize in Italy from a judging panel of teenagers, teaching a class in Berlin in his terribly, unknowingly broken German — everything is a reminder of past trips, old humiliations, decades reflected in the eyes of new admirers and critics alike. In the hands of a funny, mysteriously omniscient narrator with a knack for metaphor and flashback, Less is more than just a hapless victim of his experiences — he is an unwitting hero, bearing the torch of uncertainty, surprise, and occasional delight that an accumulated life can bring.

— Ben Hoffman, Greenlight Bookstore [686 Fulton St. between S. Elliott Place and S. Portland Avenue in Fort Greene, (718) 246–0200, www.greenlightbookstore.com].

Updated 5:42 pm, July 9, 2018
Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:

Reasonable discourse

John Mazzella from next door says:
Have you read my new memoir, A Clockwork Pothead? It's got a cover that everybody loves. Read how I smoked IN the shower while lathering up, and found a away to toke with a brutal throat infection. At an iBooks and Kindle store near you. Paperbacks at aclockworkpothead@gmail.com. Thanks!
June 18, 5:07 am

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not BrooklynPaper.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to BrooklynPaper.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.

Don’t miss out!

Stay in touch with the stories people are talking about in your community:

Optional: Help us tailor our newsletters to you!