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Bandit snatches TV from snoozing straphanger

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78th Precinct

PARK SLOPE

Blues after snooze

A thief stole a man’s television after he fell asleep with it on a 2 train at Atlantic Avenue on Jan. 1.

The victim told police he nodded off at around 12:15 am, and awoke about five minutes later as his train rolled into the station to find his set stolen.

Got off lightly

A woman punched another woman in the face inside the Atlantic Avenue subway station on Jan. 5.

The victim, 21, told police she was attacked while walking down a flight of stairs at the station near Flatbush Avenue at around 10 am.

She didn’t suffer much pain, however, and was physically unharmed by the attack, cops said.

Books crook

Some goniff stole two library books that were in a shopping cart a woman left inside a Union Street grocery on Dec. 26.

The victim told police she forgot her books, “Doula Ambassadors” and “In the Womb,” inside the market between Sixth and Seventh avenues at 4:30 pm.

She returned about five minutes later, but someone had already nabbed her stuff, cart and all, cops said.

Tempers flare

Two men lost their cool inside Park Slope stores, threatening employees:

• Some guy blew his top inside a drugstore on Flatbush Avenue between Prospect and Park places at around 9:15 pm on Jan. 1, and threatened to hit an employee unless he stopped “disrespect­ing him,” cops said.

• Another man unleashed his rage inside a Seventh Avenue cigar shop between Eighth and Ninth streets at 6 am on Jan. 3, telling a worker, “I want to fight you!” according to police.

— Colin Mixson

Updated 5:50 pm, July 9, 2018
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