Sections

November 30, 2018 / GO Brooklyn / Where to GO / Five Things to Do in Brooklyn This Week

Five things to do in Brooklyn, Nov. 30–Dec. 6

Big mayor, big candle: The large Mayor DeBlasio lit Brooklyn’s largest menorah in 2016. This year’s Hanukkah celebration kicks off on Dec. 2.
Brooklyn Paper
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:

Saturday

Dec. 1

Work it!

Sashay, shantay! Do your thing on the runway at the Brooklyn Public Library’s People’s Ball, where your most glamorous outfit can finally get the recognition it deserves. The night will feature music from Rimarkable, a dance performance, a cash bar, and a catwalk show every hour for anyone who wants to volunteer.

7 pm–midnight at Central Branch of the Brooklyn Public Library [10 Grand Army Plaza at Eastern Parkway in Prospect Heights, (718) 230-2100, www.bklynlibrary.org]. Free (RSVP requested).

Sunday

Dec. 2

At first light

Chabad Park Slope throws a party for the first night of Hanukkah! Head to Grand Army Plaza at 4:30 pm, when the Jewish rock band Pey Dald will kick things off with some hot tunes. Then grab a free latke and wait for the lighting of Brooklyn’s 33-foot 11-inch high menorah at 5:30 pm. Slightly more restrained lighting ceremonies will happen for the next eight nights.

4:30 pm at Grand Army Plaza [Flatbush Avenue and Eastern Parkway in Prospect Heights, (646) 298–9909, www.largestmenorah.com]. Free.

MOnday

Dec. 3

Santa’s slay

Indulge in the darkest side of the Christmas season at this month’s Video Vortex at Alamo Drafthouse: “Satan Claus Is Coming to Town.” The 75-minute thrill ride stitches together dozens of little-known holiday horror films into an extravaganza of evil children, axe-wielding elves, and shots of a shotgun-wielding Mrs. Claus.

9:30 pm at Alamo Drafthouse Cinema [445 Albee Square West between Fulton and Willoughby streets Downtown, (718) 513–2547, www.drafthouse.com/nyc]. $5.

Wednesday

Dec. 5

Lush life

Everyone knows Duke Ellington, but do you know his longtime collaborator Billy Strayhorne? The openly gay composer and civil rights campaigner takes center stage in the joyous dance-theater piece “Halfway to Dawn,” which draws on his writing and music to tell the story of his life in two acts, one set in a nightclub, the other in a dreamscape. The show continues through Saturday.

7:30 pm at BAM Harvey Theater [651 Fulton St. at Rockwell Place in Fort Greene, (718) 636–4100, www.bam.org]. $20–$45.

Thursday

Dec. 6

Close it down

The three-night Janelle James Comedy Festival concludes tonight at the Bell House with an amazing lineup of “Comedians Who Said ‘Sure, I’ll Come By,’ ” including Eugene Mirman, Catherine Cohen, Nore Davis, and — of course — your host Janelle James. Expect some wacky surprises and special guest stars as James makes the festival her own.

7:30 pm at the Bell House [149 Seventh St. at Third Avenue in Gowanus, (718) 643–6510, www.thebellhouseny.com]. $25 ($20 in advance).

Posted 12:00 am, November 30, 2018
Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:

Reasonable discourse

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not BrooklynPaper.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to BrooklynPaper.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.

Keep it local!

Stay in touch with your community. Subscribe to our free newsletter:

Optional: