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Comic-can do! Class will teach anyone to draw funnybooks

Delivering comics: Laura Lannes, who drew this image, will lead a class on comics at the Brooklyn Public Library on March 23.
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It is more than a panel discussion!

A new cartooning workshop will teach aspiring illustrators how to turn their ideas into complete comic books, at the Brooklyn Public Library on March 23. The class is designed to provide support to artists of all experience levels, according to its curator.

“We want to lower the barrier to entry for cartoonists who maybe don’t have the money, or don’t know where to start. But also, we want to allow cartoonists to meet other cartoonists, editors, and publishers,” said Leigh Hurwitz, an outreach coordinator at the library.

“Everything is Comics: How to Make Anything You Want” is the latest installment in the monthly “Cool Work x Interesting People” comics workshop series at the Brooklyn Public Library’s Central branch, which will continue through June. Each class is taught by a different artist, who can provide a distinct perspective on the comic industry, said Hurwitz.

“Each class is hosted by an indie cartoonist at the forefront of a new and progressive movement in the industry,” she said.

A professional illustrator, who has contributed to the New York Times and Entertainment Weekly, will lead the upcoming workshop. She hopes to teach cartoonists of all stripes to experiment with new techniques.

“It would be fun to try out different things with people who are already cartoonists, but if there are any first-timers, I would love to reach them before they are taught the usual comics ‘dos and don’ts,’ ” said Laura Lannes.

Illustrators are too often expected to follow arbitrary rules passed down in comics classes and how-to books, which can restrict their creativity, she said.

“I think comics can be anything the artist wants. A lot of the so-called ‘rules’ of comics strike me as gate-keeping,” said Lannes. “I would love for anyone who attends my workshop to take home that however they want to make comics, that is the correct way to do it for them.”

Previous classes have drawn a diverse crowd of approximately 40, according to Hurwitz.

“We had a wide range of people. We’ve had seasoned comic artists, and we had a parent with their 12-year-old,” she said. “It’s a great environment. It’s a great vibe.”

“Everything is Comics” workshop at the Brooklyn Public Library Central Library, Trustees Room [10 Grand Army Plaza at Eastern Parkway in Prospect Heights, (718) 230–2100, www.bklynlibrary.org]. March 23 at 1 pm. Free.

Updated 11:10 am, March 20, 2019
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Reasonable discourse

Wilbur D. Horse from Nowheresville says:
In this article, you say the event is at "10 Grand Army Plaza AT ATLANTIC AVENUE." Don't you mean Flatbush Ave?? Does anyone on your staff proofread these things?
March 20, 7:04 am

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