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Boundless fun: World’s biggest bouncy house makes a stop in Brooklyn

Brooklyn Paper
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Photo gallery

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Children enjoy bouncing on the Big Bounce America — the biggest bounce house in the world-at Floyd Bennet Field.
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A child enjoys sliding and bouncing at Big Bounce America at Floyd Bennet Field.
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Mark Alvarez and his son slide down one of the slides at Big Bounce America.
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Kids enjoy one of the attractions at the Big Bounce America bounce house at Floyd Bennet Field.
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Jolynn Baker and Olivia Cutrone bouncing at the Big Bounce America event at Floyd Bennet Field.

Kings County kids jumped at the chance to play in the world’s largest bouncy castle at Floyd Bennett Field last weekend.

A veritable bouncy mansion, Big Bounce America is larger than a baseball diamond, and you don’t have to take the owner’s word that his inflatable fun zone has set a global record by leaps and bounds!

“It’s the biggest bounce house in the world — according to the Guinness Book of World Records,” owner Cammy Craig said.

But the massive bouncy castle wasn’t Big Bounce America’s only attraction, and Craig came to Brooklyn with an entire bouncy complex, which kids treated to amusements included a ball pit, climbing towers, slides, basketball hoops, and an obstacle course, dubbed “The Giant,” which is an spans nearly three football fields.

Other attractions included “AirSpace”, a spaceship-themed slide, and a sprawling maze.

The bouncy house will be in Brooklyn until Aug. 5, and offers time slots for various age groups, including youngsters, teens, and adults.

Big Bounce America at Aviator Sports and Events Center [3159 Flatbush Ave. at Floyd Bennett Field in Marine Park, (833) 428–0889; [www.thebigbounceamerica.com]. July 26–Aug. 5. Times vary. $30 ($25 kids, $17 toddlers).

Reach reporter Chandler Kidd at ckidd@schnepsmedia.com or by calling (718) 260–2525. Follow her at twitter.com/ChanAnnKidd.
Updated 1:54 pm, July 31, 2019
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Reasonable discourse

John Wasserman from Prospect Heights says:
Hello. John Wasserman here. I hope I'm not too late: Upon looking over these drawings (located above) I noticed that not one of these children (or adults, for that matter) was wearing the proper protection such as helmets or any other padding, whatsoever. If you don't mind my saying so, this has bad news written all over it. What could start as a good intended "fun time" could very easily and quickly turn in to a day of remorse and bloodshed. I pray for these children. Shame on you, Cammy Craig, if that is in fact your real name. I hate to say it, but this needs to be stopped at once. -John Wasserman/Prospect Heights/Parent
July 31, 11:50 am
John Wasserman from Prospect Heights says:
I apologize my above letter came off as aggressive, but we do need to think about the future, and I might not always be around. We need to keep our children alive. Pardon the interruption. -John Wasserman
July 31, 11:52 am

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