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Retired justice honored with award in name of late local judge

Brooklyn Paper
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Photo gallery

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A large crowd filled the the Appellate Division of the New York State Supreme Court in Brooklyn Heights for the ceremony.
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Event organizers with the Brooklyn Bar and Judicial Friends associations hung a portrait of Thompson, who died in December, inside the courthouse.
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Award recipient Justice Priscilla Hall, center left, showed off the honor beside Thompson’s son, former New York City Comptroller William Thompson, Jr., center right, Justice Sylvia Hinds-Radix, right, and other attendees.
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Retired New York State Supreme Court Justice Priscilla Hall addressed the audience after receiving the award.
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Dinkins, far left, New York State Attorney General Letitia James, center left, Hinds-Radix, center right, and other guests were all smiles.

Call it a celebration of a life well-lived — and a job well-done.

Local luminaries and legal eagles gathered this month to honor the legacy of the late Kings County jurist Justice William Thompson, by presenting another accomplished judge with an award in his name.

Celebrants packed the Appellate Division of the New York State Supreme Court in Brooklyn Heights for the Feb. 13 event — co-hosted by the Brooklyn Bar and Judicial Friends associations — where they presented retired state Supreme Court Judge Priscilla Hall with the first-ever Hon. William C. Thompson Award, recognizing Hall’s near decade on the bench.

Hall served as an associate justice in the Appellate Division of the state Supreme Court, which former Gov. David Patterson appointed her to in March 2009. She retired from the bench nine years later, in March 2018 — roughly nine months before Thompson died last December at 94-years-old.

Thompson’s distinguished career included such trailblazing achievements as serving as Brooklyn’s first black state senator, Kings County’s first black administrative judge, and the first black New York State Supreme Court justice.

Posted 12:00 am, February 22, 2019
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