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Pissing match on Dean St

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Residents of a block in Boerum Hill have known for months that rogue urinators were defiling their street, but they never had the proof to convince local police of a scatological conspiracy on Dean Street — until now.

A two-liter container of human urine, complete with syringes bobbing in the waste, was found Sunday morning between Bond and Nevins streets — and the repulsive find was finally enough to prove to cops that residents were being tormented by micturating hellions and not merely dogs with overactive bladders.

“It’s absolutely gross,” said Joseph Samulski, who had the misfortune of finding the container on his front steps. “I don’t even know how you could accumulate that much urine.”

But on the brighter side, “It was the first time we were able to establish what we’ve been saying on our block — that someone has been pouring urine on cars.”

After the police arrived on Sunday, workers from the Department of Sanitation removed the waste.

The pissing match broke out on the day of the block party last September, when several people emerged from their homes near the Nevins Street end of the block to encounter an overpowering stench of liquid waste on the street and in one man’s pickup truck.

Since then, that pickup truck has been showered at least two other times.

“Thankfully, whenever it happened, my truck needed a good washing anyway,” said good sport Kevin McGowan.

The block was the site of an earlier strange disturbance, in December 2006, when a pressurized air rifle canister exploded inside a brownstone, blowing out its windows. Police found drugs and drug paraphernalia inside, and two residents were subsequently charged with misdemeanor drugs and weapons possession.

One long-term homeowner said the new problems, as nauseating as they may be, are small potatoes compared to her early days in Boerum Hill, when the neighborhood was a Jonathan Lethem-esque red-light district full of unsavory johns, pimps and ladies of the night.

“It’s generally quiet compared to what it was,” in the 1970s, said Nancy Steinson.

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Reader Feedback

James from Marine Park says:
Many people in Marine Park own 2 mutts. If these double doggie folks don't pick up, or at least have their precious pets go in the gutter, instead of the sidewalk, you have twice the reasons to pay close atention to where you put your feet. The only way to really enforce would be to compile a doggie DNA database for all mutts in New York. Then, when it's left on the street, a sample can be taken, analyzed, and a good stiff fine collected. This would be a real cash cow for a financially desperate town like New York. It would be the only way filthy, inconsiderate mutt lovers could be taught the basics of sanitation, responsibility, and consideration for their fellow Brooklynites.
Oct. 28, 2011, 10:58 pm

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