Today’s news:

Man loses leg in Eighth Avenue crash

The Brooklyn Paper

A wayward livery cab driver sparked a bloody car accident on Saturday that left three people hospitalized — one with a mangled leg — at the corner of Eighth Avenue and 11th Street.

Witnesses to the 11 am horror show said the livery sedan was zipping up Eighth Avenue when the driver apparently lost control of the wheel.

The cab clipped 75-year-old Fred Guitterez as he crossed the street — leaving the senior with a graze wound — and then slammed into a Volkswagen Beetle parked at the corner.

The impact sent both the livery cab and the celebrated German people’s car onto the sidewalk, where they struck three more men sitting in front of Junior’s Deli before coming to a full stop.

An FDNY spokesman said that the three men were sent to Bellevue Hospital, Lutheran Medical Center and Kings County Hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

Yet according to accounts at the scene, at least one of the victims lost his leg when he was briefly pinned between the two colliding vehicles.

“I could see the bone coming out his leg,” Guitterez told reporters. “He was just screaming in a pool of blood until help came.”

The livery cab driver remained at the scene and wasn’t facing any criminal charges by late Monday.

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Reader Feedback

David from Reality says:
No charges! I guess NYPD determined that the inconvenience of staying at the scene was punishment enough for the poor driver who caused the whole whoopsie.
Sept. 21, 2010, 11:49 am
Bob from Boreum Hill says:
No charges?

If the motorist violated traffic code, the newly-enacted Elle's Law ( http://open.nysenate.gov/legislation/api/html/bill/A10617 )
defines what happened here as "Vehicular assault in the third degree" with a maximum penalty of 7 years in prison.

If the motorist did not violate traffic code, the newly-enacted Hayley and Diego's Law ( http://www.assembly.state.ny.us/leg/?default_fld=&bn=A07917&Summary=Y&Text=Y ) defines harsh penalties motorists who unintentionally injure.

Either way, charges can and should be filed. Someone should let NYPD know that people aren't allowed to squish other people with their cars anymore.
Sept. 21, 2010, 11:52 am
ch from bh says:
no charges?!?!

speeding, reckless endangerment, assault with a deadly car? aren't these crimes?

what if the victim was a cop? I bet then there'd be some charges.

BS.
Sept. 21, 2010, 3:27 pm
Dave from Park Slope says:
Ho hum. If a bike had come within six feet of someone, however, there'd have been sixty comments already.
Sept. 21, 2010, 5:57 pm
MRB from Ft Greene says:
For one thing, losing control of your vehicle is not a CRIMINAL act. It might be, if the driver was operating the vehicle in a negligent or reckless manner. At this point, we have no idea how or why the driver lost control, so why should there be charges? Is this the land of guilty until proven innocent? Let's get real folks. Many of us have been involved in accidents that we never saw coming.

For example, I once spun out on the highway after driving over a small pavement patch after a rain - the incident was basically unavoidable and I was otherwise driving in a normal manner. Thankfully no one was hurt, but if someone was, I can't imagine me being held CRIMINALLY liable for the accident.

Remember - no charges filed does not mean no consequences.
Sept. 22, 2010, 10:04 am

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