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Go Fourth! MTA to open a long-shuttered F-train entrance

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Park Slopers will no longer have to cross Fourth Avenue to get to the F-train station that bears the name of the scary boulevard.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority announced that by the end of the year, it would re-open the long-shuttered station entrance on the east side of the avenue at Ninth Street.

Neighbors hailed the move to allow straphangers to enter the station without having to cross the traffic-filled roadway, citing car and pedestrian bang-ups.

“It wasn’t a matter of if, but when there would be an incident,” said Josh Levy of the Park Slope Civil Council.

The work will cost $2.8 million and is part of ongoing renovations to the Fourth Avenue station and the elevated viaduct between Carroll Gardens and Park Slope. The work on the tracks has eliminated Manhattan-bound F service to Smith-Ninth Street and Manhattan-bound F and G service at 15th Street and Fort Hamilton Parkway.

Borough President Markowitz put up $2 million for the improvements for the station, which critics say shares the same aesthetic of a Turkish prison.. The Beep says that the work could morph the street from a “traffic chute” to “a grand Brooklyn boulevard.”

Levy agrees.

“Micro communities grow out of these transportation hubs,” Levy said. “It will be as good for retailers as commuters.”

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Reader Feedback

Billy Gray from Greenpoint says:
> The Beep says that the work could morph the street from a “traffic chute” to “a grand Brooklyn boulevard.”

Too bad the Beep doesn't fight for improvements to the street, to make it safer for pedestrians. The guy has never seen a "traffic chute" he didn't like. Very nice of him to donate his money, but he could do the same and serve his community better by stepping down from elected office. Instead he regularly uses his political clout to stifle community-organized safety improvements to our streets.
Feb. 11, 2011, 10:44 am
ch from bh says:
You said it, Billy Gray.
Feb. 11, 2011, 11:01 am
Steve from PPW says:
If the plan to make 4th a grand boulevard includes a bike lane or so much as a mention of "traffic calming" or enforcing the speed limit, watch how quickly Marty Markowitz changes his tune on "traffic chutes." Marty's single political view: Don't mess with cars!

Josh Levy seems to have a better understanding of 4th Avenue's problems and real solutions than Marty.
Feb. 11, 2011, 11:42 am
Will from Windsor Terrace says:
I'm not sure Marty realizes exactly how much of Brooklyn's voting base he's alienating with all his anti-bike advocacy. Entire neighborhoods have turned against him.
Feb. 11, 2011, 12:55 pm
Dock Oscar from Puke Slop says:
Glad the neglected F train is getting some relief. It seems that the MTA has been "improving" the F line since I've been here (16 yrs and counting). What about the R train?
OMFG! Since the M train disappeared, the evening rush train experience is like Calcutta (I'm sure it's better over there). Average time btw trains now is 15 min. People can't get on the trains, packed like sausage. Some one has a mass transit dislike to South Slope.
Feb. 11, 2011, 1:59 pm
cars rock from 4th avenue expressway says:
I'm not sure Marty realizes exactly how much of Brooklyn's voting base he's representing with all his anti-bike advocacy. Entire neighborhoods have turned towards him.
Feb. 12, 2011, 11:30 am

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