Sections

Stats prove Prospect Park bike crackdown is real

The Brooklyn Paper
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like The Brooklyn Paper on Facebook.

Riding a bike too fast in Prospect Park can cause some serious damage — to your wallet.

Park cops slapped cyclists with a whopping 188 tickets over the past four months compared to zero over the same period last year after several near-fatal bike-pedestrian crashes on the popular roadway.

“Cyclists need to know that a ticket is a very real possibility,” said Prospect Park Alliance President Emily Lloyd.

Parks Department officers wrote summonses ranging between $50 and $200 for “failure to comply with bicycle restrictions” including running red lights, speeding, and riding against traffic as part of a ticket blitz intended to improve safety along the loop, according to city officials.

The summons figures obtained by The Brooklyn Paper are the first concrete evidence that the city wasn’t just spinning its wheels when it promised to crack down on rogue cyclists in November.

But some bike riders say stopping at every red light is unnecessary and difficult, especially when riding downhill.

“It’s hard — they’re asking us to screech to a halt,” said cyclist Anthony Lowe.

“Pedestrians are part of the problem, too.”

Others cyclists who train for races on the loop say the lights should be set to blink yellow all the time — letting pelotons cruise through without facing the risk of tickets — because there are few other places in the city where they can train.

Too much enforcement, they say, could morph Brooklyn’s backyard, and the outdoor culture it attracts, into what feels more like a Singapore-style police state.

Park activists, however, contend serious enforcement is necessary because the roadway was not designed to be used as a velodrome.

“The very first concern must be for the safety of the public,” said Geoffrey Croft of NYC Park Advocates. “A number of cyclists [are] moving way too fast.”

The bicycle crackdown comes on the heels of several high profile crashes, including one that landed 54-year-old walker Linda Cohen in the hospital in a medically induced coma.

Those collisions sparked an impassioned movement to make the roadway less chaotic, starting with a controversial effort to slow cyclists on a dangerous downhill by funneling them into a narrow chute lined on both sides by traffic barrels. Workers yanked the barrels before a panel of city officials and park advocates unveiled a plan to redesign the roadway that promises to give less room to motorists and more space to pedestrians and cyclists — but also calls for more outreach and enforcement along the drive.

The ticket blitz pleases Nancy Moccaldi, a close friend of Cohen, who suffered brain damage after a cyclist hit her in the park.

“It will make people more aware,” she said. “These laws exist for a reason.”

Reach reporter Natalie O'Neill at noneill@cnglocal.com or by calling her at (718) 260-4505.

Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like The Brooklyn Paper on Facebook.

Reader Feedback

BrianVan from Kips Bay says:
Natalie, when will you devote as much column space to cars killing people in Brooklyn almost daily? Or is that not a story because death is just a routine consequence of "driver's privilege"?

Your tendency to cater to the small, irrational group of people who would care about this story - while neglecting far more serious road safety concerns - is an indication that you should not be working as a beat journalist. You're not reporting as much as you are carrying water for fringe, extremist community groups who want all the free press you can shovel at them. It means you'll never get this story right; you'll only trigger screaming matches among irrelevant, narcissistic people who love to argue and would have done it without your help anyway. These people waste our time. And you waste our time in telling us about them 2-3 times a week.

BTW, has anyone yet to point out the absurdity of the police assigning nearly 200 tickets in the dead of winter for the offense of RIDING A BIKE IN A PARK? They must have a lot of free time lately! I guess I didn't hear about when they caught the Park Slope rapist!
March 12, 2012, 9:52 am
Doug G. from Park Slope says:
The 78th Precinct wrote 22 speeding tickets to drivers in the month of January in the entire precinct. It wrote 7 tickets to drivers for failure to yield to pedestrians. Just one ticket for improper turning and zero tickets for illegal u-turns.

A radar-gun study by Park Slope Neighbors showed 193 drivers speeding in Prospect Park in just two hours.
March 12, 2012, 10:03 am
wkgreen from Park Slope says:
The idea that NYPD would crack down on speeding bikes and not on cars is just weird. A bicycle can only hit the 25 mph speed limit at one location, and then just barely. Most that were found to be speeding in the crackdowns in Nov. and Dec. were doing less than 30. The fastest one was clocked at 31 MPH. Cars on the loop, on the other hand, routinely break the law. In fact a recent survey by Eric McClure of Park Slope Neighbors found that 193 out of 195 vehicles there exceeded the limit with one going as fast as 53. In fact half of all drivers were going at least 39 mph. Unlike bikes, however, cars are capable of maintaining max. speed anywhere along the full extent of the road.

By all means ticket bikes for going the wrong way (especially the ones without lights when it is dark) or for impeding or endangering pedestrians in the crosswalk when they have the right-of-way, but if the problem of bicycles is speeding then the solution is simple. Keep people out of the road at the only location where it is possible.

http://www.streetsblog.org/2012/02/29/prospect-park-users-thanks-for-the-road-diet-now-lets-make-it-car-free/
March 12, 2012, 10:17 am
Eric McClure from Park Slope says:
There are surely some legitimate reasons to write tickets to cyclists in Prospect Park, first and foremost for endangering pedestrians by riding through a populated crosswalk at high speed against a red light.

But citing cyclists for speeding when 99% of drivers are breaking the speed limit, some at highway speeds? Park Slope Neighbors' radar survey found that the average speed of cars in the park was more than 38 MPH -- 13 MPH over the speed limit. No single bicycle could even reach the AVERAGE speed of drivers.

Let's get our enforcement priorities straight.
March 12, 2012, 10:20 am
Eric McClure from Park Slope says:
There are surely some legitimate reasons to write tickets to cyclists in Prospect Park, first and foremost for endangering pedestrians by riding through a populated crosswalk at high speed against a red light.

But citing cyclists for speeding when 99% of drivers are breaking the speed limit, some at highway speeds? Park Slope Neighbors' radar survey found that the average speed of cars in the park was more than 38 MPH -- 13 MPH over the speed limit. No single bicycle could even reach the AVERAGE speed of drivers.

Let's get our enforcement priorities straight.
March 12, 2012, 10:20 am
Eric McClure from Park Slope says:
There are surely some legitimate reasons to write tickets to cyclists in Prospect Park, first and foremost for endangering pedestrians by riding through a populated crosswalk at high speed against a red light.

But citing cyclists for speeding when 99% of drivers are breaking the speed limit, some at highway speeds? Park Slope Neighbors' radar survey found that the average speed of cars in the park was more than 38 MPH -- 13 MPH over the speed limit. No single bicycle could even reach the AVERAGE speed of drivers.

Let's get our enforcement priorities straight.
March 12, 2012, 10:21 am
CC from Park Slope says:
I agree with the others saying they need to also be getting car drivers. Many mornings lately a cop car in the loop has been shouting over their speaker to the cars, "slow down". The cars were clearly speeding and during my morning walks around the lake I've not seen them ticket one car that was speeding or running the red lights, which they frequently do.
March 12, 2012, 10:48 am
Peter from Park Slope says:
Until NYPD catches the Park Slope rapist, and does something about all the drivers speeding recklessly through both the park *and* the neighborhood, this is an absurd misuse of resources.
March 12, 2012, 11:20 am
Peter from Park Slope says:
Until NYPD catches the Park Slope rapist, and does something about all the drivers speeding recklessly through both the park *and* the neighborhood, this is an absurd misuse of resources.
March 12, 2012, 11:20 am
Joe R. from Flushing says:
The defacto standard for valid speeding tickets is 10% above the limit plus 4 mph. In the case of a 25 mph limit then they need to clock cyclists at 31.5 mph (rounds up to 32 mph) or better. There is no shortage of cars meeting that standard, it seems. Maybe that's who the police should be going after.

And why should anyone (cyclist or even car) have to stop at red lights in the park if nobody is crossing? That's just plain silly. The lights should either be flashing yellow, or demand actuated via buttons or pedestrian sensors.
March 12, 2012, 11:45 am
ty from pps says:
Joe R -- I believe the traffic lights were installed because the cars were racing around the park and were not yielding to pedestrians. Basically, it was a band-aid for one small group of that degraded the park experience for EVERYONE.

You're absolutely right. There should be no need for traffic lights. These aren't intersections -- they're pedestrian crossings. They should absolutely be actuated with buttons -- with immediate effect... no wait time for the pedestrians -- the pedestrian presses the button and the light *immediately* turns yellow, then red.

Bicycles will stop if they actually know someone is crossing. Right now, the lights are meaningless -- the boy who cried wolf. They are simply there to slow cars down. (yes, all of you annoying people, yes, there are a-holes that don't yield... just hush.)
March 12, 2012, 12:10 pm
Neigborhood Guy from Park Slope says:
Gee, I wonder what Tal Barzilai of Pleasantville, New York thinks about this issue.
March 12, 2012, 1:22 pm
John from Park Slope says:
Natalie - I think we all recognize that every time you write about the challenges of dealing with dangerous rogue cyclists, there will be hyperbolic outcry from the cycling extremists. However, we appreciate the light that you bring to these issues, and encourage your ongoing reporting.

The truth is that cyclists are bringing this increased enforcement upon themselves. Comments like "BTW, has anyone yet to point out the absurdity of the police assigning nearly 200 tickets in the dead of winter for the offense of RIDING A BIKE IN A PARK?" just goes to show how myopic and unreasonable that some of these cycling advocates can be. They are unwilling or unable to understand that pedestrians, parents, children and others have the fundamental right not to be terrorized by dangerous, racing, rogue cyclists "IN A PARK" who are not stopping for pedestrians, who are riding against traffic, and who are choosing to commit scores of other dangerous violations.

Only once the cycling extremists understand that they have an obligation to share space with all of the other park users and respect our right of way, will they figure out how to navigate themselves out of this hole they've dug for themselves with the public and our public officials.
March 12, 2012, 1:29 pm
Eric McClure from Park Slope says:
Joe R., in our sample of 195 cars, 180 drivers were traveling 32 MPH or faster -- 92.3% of the cars using the park. And that was in the space of about an hour. NYPD could have written more speeding tickets to drivers in one evening than they wrote for cyclists in four months.
March 12, 2012, 1:49 pm
Jerry from Boerum Hill says:
Me, my wife, my 7-year-old son and my 10-year-old daughter are not cycling extremists.

How ridiculous that we have to stop for red lights meant for cars in a park even when no one is waiting to cross!
March 12, 2012, 2:21 pm
ty from pps says:
To paraphrase "John from Park Slope" -- The truth is that drivers are bringing this increased enforcement upon themselves.

Oh wait. That's right. There is no real enforcement for automotive traffic. Just politically expedient "shows" by the NYPD that have nothing to do with prioritizing safety.
March 12, 2012, 2:25 pm
ty from pps says:
Jerry -- I dunno. You sound a lot like an extremist to me. Next thing you're going to say is some other bike zealot extremist comment like, "They should maybe think about installing another bike rack at the library." Oh, wouldn't that be nice! So you and your bicycle extremist friends can all get together and read books. Is there no end to your outrageous behavior!?!
March 12, 2012, 2:28 pm
annonymous from Gowanus says:
Why is Emily Lloyd stumping for the police? I'm considering not donating any more to the Prospect Park Alliance. Let them get their funds from the drivers who use the parks.
March 12, 2012, 2:36 pm
Other Michael from Park Slope says:
First those traffic lights were put there because cars are allowed to drive through the park. They should be turned off, or set to blinking yellow when there is no auto traffic.

But as a running I am more worried that the police are going to ticket me when I run loops of the park and don't stop at red lights.
March 12, 2012, 2:57 pm
Tal Barzilai from Pleasantville, NY says:
As usual, the usual bike zealots are acting like victims to the rules and are crying foul to the crackdowns. Both Natalie and John are right to say this, because they are right. Just because you don't hear about the NYPD going after cars that speeding much doesn't mean that they aren't doing it at all. According to the laws, cyclists are required to obey all traffic lights and signs rather than flout them. Just because there is nobody crossing or on the intersecting road, doesn't give the right to run especially when regular motor vehicles can't do this. Enough with the scapegoating motorists for your problems when it's really your own attitude that leads to all this enforcement. If you really want it all to stop, then start following the rules already rather than acting as if you are above them.
March 12, 2012, 3:26 pm
ty from pps says:
Tal -- It's good to see you back writing irrational, fact-free crap.

"Just because you don't hear about the NYPD going after cars that speeding much doesn't mean that they aren't doing it at all."

Actually, it's not a matter of "hearing about it" -- the NYPD publishes their numbers. You should try actually READING the comments before you go straight for saying the same tired crap over and over again. Try reading Doug G. comment above. It's the second comment. Easy to find, even for folks with a limited intellect like you.

Do you know we are discussing the PARK, specifically and only?? If you don't see a difference between a park road (with no intersections, just pedestrian crossings) and a city street, well... you're even dimmer than I thought.
March 12, 2012, 4:10 pm
Other Michael from Park Slope says:
Go away Tal

If you would actually set foot in Prospect Park during the middle of the day you would see how ridiculous it is that the traffic lights change from red to green.

Then hang around and try to walk in the pedestrian lane that goes down the hill by Prospect Park South West. You can be 3 feet from cars speeding by at 45 miles an hour.

and yes: Just because you don't hear about the NYPD Going after cars that speeding much DOES mean that they aren't doing it at all" There have been ZERO speeding tickets issued in the 78th precinct. THEY ARE NOT DOING IT AT ALL

Go away
March 12, 2012, 4:14 pm
ty from pps says:
Sorry about that... I feel dirty. Why do I keep replying to Tal Barzilai? He's obviously suffering from unfortunate mental problems.
March 12, 2012, 4:25 pm
Or from Yellow Hook says:
Don't think of them as traffic lights, think of them as bike calming devices. . .
March 12, 2012, 4:29 pm
Or from Yellow Hook says:
Don't think of them as traffic lights, think of them as bike calming devices. . .
March 12, 2012, 4:29 pm
Tal Barzilai from Pleasantville, NY says:
Ty, where I come from, it's those with the low intellect that use personal attacks like the ones you are using. BTW, the reason for the current bike crackdown in Prospect is because of the number of those who got injured by such cyclists. For the record, I have been in Prospect not that long ago, and I have seen what it's like there. In the words of Kelly Clarkson, "You don't know a thing about me." I have read the comments above me, and they are from the usual suspects as always such as yourselves. Let me ask you something, why do you bike zealots always use motorists as your personal scapegoats whenever there is a crackdown on you? I can understand when there are others who don't follow the rules, but you have no legitimacy to say such when you don't practice what you preach. You sound just like what the US said to Europe about slavery in the early part of the 19th century when at the same time, they didn't abolish it themselves until long after they did.
March 12, 2012, 4:36 pm
Ty from PPS says:
Tal -- Do you know something else about "where you come from"?? There is NO PROSPECT PARK or BROOKLYN anywhere near it! Go back to your mom's basement and hush.

And your comments just get dumber and crazier by the minute.
March 12, 2012, 4:48 pm
Ty from PPS says:
And I'm offended by your insensitivity. Kelly Clarkson's family owned slaves. How dare you mention slavery and that woman in the same breath!
March 12, 2012, 4:51 pm
Other Michael from Park Slope says:
Tal

When you "visited" Prospect Park was it open to auto traffic?
March 12, 2012, 5:42 pm
Jonathan from Brooklyn Heights says:
It's a good bet that many (if not most) of those 180 bicycle tickets were written during the park's car-free hours—when the drive is CLOSED to traffic—and NOT during the weekday rush-hours (7-9 am and 5-7 pm), the only times during which public automotive travel is permitted. (And when rampant speeding occurs without penalty.)

That being the case, there's a reasonable legal argument that the bicycle tickets written during those car-free hours are actually illegitimate. Why? Because, according to New York State Vehicle and Traffic Law, the park drive constitutes a "highway" subject to traffic regulations ONLY when it is "open to the public for purposes of vehicular travel", which is obviously NOT the case during car-free hours.

So the recipients of those tickets might do well to individually or collectively hire a good lawyer. This could make for a precedent-setting case that enjoins NYPD from its selective enforcement against cyclists in our public parks.
March 12, 2012, 6:56 pm
S from PPW says:
Jonathan, where is this information from? I don't doubt it, but do you have any links to back it up? I think it would be very helpful to expand upon this.
March 12, 2012, 8:35 pm
Park Sloper says:
As it happens, the accidents at which this effort is directed also occurred when cars were not in the park. No matter how much you hate car traffic, this is a bike on pedestrian problem. You would never excuse these incidents had they involved cars. Bikers need to slow down. The park is for everyone.
March 12, 2012, 8:52 pm
wkgreen from Park Slope says:
Park Sloper:

As it happens the accidents at which this effort is directed did not occur in crosswalks. And there is also no evidence that either involved illegal or excessive speed on the part of a bicycle. Speed is NOT the only issue, if indeed it is an issue at all. The last place for this to be tried is in a sensational local press. I won’t get into whether or not we excuse injury and death caused by cars. We do it all the time, but who would ever know when it seldom makes more than a blip in the news.

The park is for everyone, but people should not be allowed to do everything everywhere. Activities need appropriate locations or folks get hurt. It's also a matter of respect as much as it is of safety. I would never walk through your ball game; I would appreciate if you don’t meander aimlessly in front of my bicycle. The proposed roadway plan is a good start. Everyone who is moving in the prescribed direction has a lane. If you don’t have a lane then you should carefully and respectfully cross to get to the best location where you can safely do what you do.

It’s a big park.
March 12, 2012, 10:23 pm
Jonathan from Brooklyn Heights says:
To S from PPW:

The actions of the NYPD in Prospect Park are similar to their ticketing blitz last year in Central Park, which sparked a vocal push-back by cyclists. See links below, including remarks by a member of the Five Borough Bicycle Club citing NYS VTL. (I'm not a lawyer either.)

http://gothamist.com/2011/03/15/central_park_cyclist_red_light_crac.php

http://gothamist.com/2011/03/22/cops_ticketing_cyclists_in_central.php

http://nycc.org/message-board/defending-your-central-park-ticket/50429

To Park Sloper:

As a cyclist, walker, runner and occasional motorist, I agree that there should be no excuses if the cyclists involved in those terrible accidents in Prospect Park were actually at fault. But we simply don't know what happened in those cases. In one of them, both the pedestrian and the cyclist sued the other party; perhaps we'll get answers from court records.

Do you have more information?
March 12, 2012, 10:27 pm
Tal Barzilai from Pleasantville, NY says:
I find it an irony that many of you cyclists want the same rights to use the road as all other vehicles, but won't take the same responsibility. What is it that you really want? Do you want bicycles to be recognized as actual vehicles or not? If you do, then you have to follow the same rules as all others. BTW, the city did NOT pass any new laws recently on bicycles, they are just enforcing the ones that already exist. According to jurisdiction, only that precinct that marks that area can hand out tickets, not any others. As for traffic lights, they were designed back in 1923 by Garret Morgan to help give police officers a break from directing traffic especially when that job made their arms tired, and this was first placed at major intersections, but then took over at just about every place in major cities.
March 12, 2012, 11:20 pm
Scott from Park Slope says:
Tal, bike riders are not out to get you. It is safe to get back on the streets. As far as the ones that haunt you when you close your eyes, a good psychiatrist can help you work through that. I'm sure there are good ones in Pleasantville. We can help you find them. We're here for you, buddy.
March 12, 2012, 11:50 pm
Scott from Park Slope says:
The serious cyclists who ride in packs are fine when they train at off-peak times. They have two lanes to maneuver in and most other riders and skaters who exercise at those times are used to their presence and share the space well.

When there are pedestrians crossing the road, or others riding or travelling in the right two lanes, there can be dangerous crashes because the pedestrians don't know what to do and the cyclists so resent stopping that they resort to chaotic weaving.

It is true that the park is not a velodrome, and that the cyclists need to share the road with others. And as the fastest objects on the loop when cars aren't there, they have an obligation to yield to the slower.
March 13, 2012, Midnight
Rob from Williamsburg says:
I'd like to see a few police officers on bikes.
March 13, 2012, 12:36 am
Bob from Windsor Terrace says:
Ticket everyone who breaks park laws, however many wheels they have.
March 13, 2012, 12:42 am
common sense from bay ridge says:
The reason more cars are not given speeding tickets is because the state collects the fines, not the city. NYC Inc. is more interested in enforcing laws that they can collect the revenue from, like parking tickets, bike infractions, Sanitation, etc.
March 13, 2012, 1:19 am
Prospect Park Alliance Member from Park Slope says:
I am extraordinarily disappointed that Emily Lloyd is backing this idiotic NYPD ticket sting in Prospect Park.

Emily should, first and foremost, be moving to get motor vehicles out of the park since virtually every motor vehicle in the park is speeding (and not being targeted for summonses by the NYPD, either)

This is not the way to fix the problem, Emily. I am considering dropping my support for the Alliance until I hear Emily Lloyd talking about dealing with the problem of cars in Prospect Park -- a problem that thousands of Brooklynites have said they want the PPA to address.
March 13, 2012, 9:05 am
Stu from PPW says:
I agree. I will not support the PPA until it makes a statement calling for the eventual removal of cars from Prospect Park.
March 13, 2012, 9:54 am
Bob from Greenpoint says:
Bikers alert: cameras being insulted on Kent ave.......
that's a great idea, all we can say and ask all the bikers summer is around the corner start behaving like normal people follow rules and regulations you on the watch list.....
March 13, 2012, 10:56 am
Joe from Crown Heights says:
As a cyclist who frequents the park for training I'm in agreement with calls to better enforce traffic laws on the cars in the park. I'm not even sure why they still allow cars in the park, but that's an entirely different argument.

I've seen my fair share of reckless cycling behavior but no where near as much as the reckless, careless and just plain idiotic pedestrian behavior. The paths are very clearly marked for proper lane usage. Perhaps if more pedestrians weren't walking in or against traffic in the bike lanes there would be less pedestrians hit by cyclists in the *gasp* bike lanes. Also, I've witness on more than one occasion, pedestrians entering the roadway in non-crosswalk areas without looking, on cell phones, walking backwards, etc.

Common sense. Try it out.
March 13, 2012, 1:11 pm
PPA Member from Gowanus says:
I am also considering dropping my support for the PPA until they come out unequivocally against cars in the park. Can someone start an online petition?

I recently received a members survey from PPA. Cycling was not even listed as an activity. Even if you don't ride around the loop road for exercise, many people use it to get places in the park.
March 13, 2012, 1:11 pm
Tal Barzilai from Pleasantville, NY says:
Please understand that asking for cyclists to follow the rules is NOT a call to get them off the road. It's time that you bike zealots started loosening your tin foil hats on that. Also, it doesn't mean that anyone is anti-bicycle either just for wanting the enforcement. At first, everyone gave you the benefit of the doubt, and now they see you all as nothing but a bunch of those who believe that they are above all others and that the rules don't apply to them. I could never understand the irony here when you guys call for motorists to follow every letter of the law and have strict enforcement, while crying foul whenever they are told to follow the rules. BTW, most NYers want you to follow the rules and be held responsible when they don't. Maybe licensing, registering, and insuring bicycles won't be a bad idea afterall, but the bike zealots will oppose this not because of the costs, but because of actually being tracked and caught when they don't stay for the accident.
March 13, 2012, 5:21 pm
Will from parkside ave says:
Why do the speeding, Lance Armstrong wannabees never notice that they are oblivious to everything when in the racing frame of mind? Am glad something is being done about it.
March 13, 2012, 5:21 pm
Other Michael from Park Slope says:
Ok Tal

as an Official Bike Zealot, and Ruler of Streetbloggers I hereby instruct all cyclists to follow all laws.

NOW GO AWAY
March 13, 2012, 6:41 pm
Other Michael from Park Slope says:
Ok Tal

as an Official Bike Zealot, and Ruler of Streetbloggers I hereby instruct all cyclists to follow all laws.

NOW GO AWAY
March 13, 2012, 6:41 pm
wkgreen from Park Slope says:
Will from parkside:
That makes no sense. How can these "Lance Armstrong wannabees" be "oblivious to everything" when in a "racing frame of mind"? If they were not aware of their surroundings while going as fast as you seem to believe they'd all be in the hospital!
March 13, 2012, 7:12 pm
Dave from Park Slope says:
Is that really Yoda posing as "Bob" at 10:56 am? 'Cause I can't really decipher his syntax.
March 14, 2012, 10:05 am
Tal Barzilai from Pleasantville, NY says:
If there should be a petition, it should be for citywide enforcement on bicycles. Many see them as coming to them without any warning especially when they are flouting the traffic laws. Also, it should require all adult cyclists to be licensed, registered, and insured. BTW, some of this goes all the way back to the Koch administration when he started to renege on protected bike lanes after hearing how many cyclists were flouting the laws, so this isn't something new here just to let you know. Overall, until you guys start following the rules rather than acting like victims, there will continue to be crackdowns. Once again, I thank Natalie for this very truthful article. In the words of Confucius, "Respect is something one must earn, not demand."
March 14, 2012, 3:37 pm
Chris from Bushwick says:
Tal,

We're no longer even bothered by your comments anymore, we just feel bad about your unending obsession with bicycles and your compulsion to comment on any news article about them.

Seriously, we're worried about you. Seek professional help. Please.
March 16, 2012, 3:22 pm
Tal Barzilai from Pleasantville, NY says:
Chris, you and your bike zealot friends really need to learn how to chill. You guys got to have your say, so let others have theirs'. For the record, nobody is calling for you to be censored, so knock it off with doing that to me. Believe it or not, most do want your kind to follow the rules, so the called ticket blitz is really a reaction to your group in believing that they are holier than thou. On a side note, freedom of speech applies to everyone, not just your kind only. Democracy is a double edged sword, because it can work with you and against you at the same time, so enough with Vladmir Illych Lenin talk who is known for this famous quote on a cartoon, "Freedom for me, none for thee."
March 16, 2012, 3:30 pm
Jonathan from Brooklyn Heights says:
Cyclists take note:

Next Friday, Steve Vaccaro, an attorney and member of the Five Borough Bicycle Club, will speak and answer questions on cycling law topics, including the Prospect Park ticket blitz.

Friday, March 23, 6:30 PM
REI Community Room
295 Lafayette Street (btw Houston & Prince)

http://www.5bbc.org/events.shtml
March 16, 2012, 3:46 pm
Other Michael from Park Slope says:
Tal

Go away and propose those rules in Pleasantville, NY.

or JUST GO AWAY.
March 16, 2012, 6:10 pm
Sarah from Ditmas Park says:
I like the idea of a velodrome very much. Maybe build a 'flyover' velodrome so cyclists can speed to their heart's content, safely away from toddlers and old people walking below. But maybe not in prospect park, maybe it's suspended off the BQE.
March 23, 2012, 4:34 pm
Detroit Mac from exBrooklyn says:
One major point to make: The Park roads were originally designed for cyclists (and horses carriages).
June 19, 2013, 9:39 am

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not BrooklynPaper.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to BrooklynPaper.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.

This week’s featured advertisers