Today’s news:

Cutting the G train will kill Brooklyn romances — really!

The Brooklyn Paper

Killing the G train extension is an assault on romance that will push many straphanging couples into long distance mode, and might even break them up, lovebirds say.

Busy couples that depend on the at-risk G train extension — which provides one-seat service between North and Brownstone Brooklyns — worry that chopping the subway line will make cross-borough relationships the third rail of dating.

“It would be almost impossible to see each other,” said Amber Van Natten, a Greenwood Heights resident whose boyfriend resides in Greenpoint. “It’s a huge disservice to relationships.”

Her beau, Christopher Moessner, lives near the Nassau Avenue station — a seven-mile, 50-minute trek from her home that involves planning ahead and packing a bag.

If the Metropolitan Transportation Authority cuts service at the five stops in Park Slope, Windsor Terrace and Kensington — dating would become much tougher for the couple.

And they’re not alone.

Other Brooklynites proclaim, only half-jokingly, that they might have to split if the city nixes G service at Fourth Avenue–Ninth Street, Seventh Avenue, 15th Street–Prospect Park, Fort Hamilton Parkway and Church Avenue.

“My girlfriend lives in Park Slope and we’ll have to break up if the G line extension stops,” James Botha wrote while signing a petition to maintain the train service.

The extension of the G only began two and a half years ago when the MTA started a lengthy overhaul of the Culver Viaduct that prevented the agency from turning the train around at Smith–Ninth Street — a fortunate mishap that connected Fort Greene, Clinton Hill, Bedford-Stuyvessant, Williamsburg, and Greenpoint with Park Slope, Windsor Terrace, and Kensington.

But the added service is now inching closer to a last stop due to a soon-to-expire contract, which wraps up when work on the F and G lines concludes next winter.

A transfer between the F and the G might not seem like a big deal, but minutes count in the game of love.

Lovelorn antidotes abound, but a recent Swedish study backs up the stranphangers’ concerns: researchers found that couples who commute more than 45 minutes are 40 percent more likely to split.

G train boosting politician Lincoln Restler, who is circulating a petition to save the service, took to Twitter to make sure the MTA doesn’t let the doors close on Brooklyn lovers.

“Relationships are statistically less likely to withstand multiple train transfers,” he said. “Save the Brooklyn Local!”

Reach reporter Natalie O'Neill at noneill@cnglocal.com or by calling her at (718) 260-4505.

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Or from Yellow Hook says:
Who says you don't need a car in Brooklyn?
March 21, 2012, 8:23 am
Or from Yellow Hook says:
Who says you don't need a car in Brooklyn?
March 21, 2012, 8:23 am
Mike from Williamsburg says:
I don't think people should date people from other parts of Brooklyn anyway.
March 21, 2012, 9:09 am
Ben K from Park Slope says:
When these people say "it would be almost impossible to see each other," what they really mean is, "I'm too impatient to wait for two trains to get somewhere." I'm all in favor of keeping this G train service in existence, but that is the dumbest argument I've heard so far.
March 21, 2012, 9:43 am
kool from eny says:
I used to travel over 2 hours to see a former girlfriend via subway. The G train will be missed (and is needed IMO) but if you really want to see that person, hop on a bus. LOL
March 21, 2012, 10:22 am
Ben K's Friend from Queens says:
Well said Ben K. The printed word should mean something, and we need to stand up for quality journalism. You get what you pay for with these free media outlets.
March 21, 2012, 10:24 am
Ben K's Friend from Queens says:
Well said Ben K. The printed word should mean something, and we need to stand up for quality journalism. You get what you pay for with these free media outlets.
March 21, 2012, 10:24 am
SwampYankee from ruined Brooklyn says:
Why don't the lovers cycle back and forth? Plenty of bike lanes and we really should all be using bikes anyway, no?
March 21, 2012, 10:40 am
jinx from bk says:
MTA = cockblockers
March 21, 2012, 10:57 am
ChrisC from Sunset Park says:
Finally some reasoning that doesn't rely on stoking Brooklyn-Manhattan resentments. Long travel is definitely a fixed source of stress in a relationship, whether romantic or family. Just because the G line doesn't run from bedroom neighborhoods to workplace districts doesn't mean it's not a vital part of the city's social fabric.
March 21, 2012, 11:23 am
ChrisC from Sunset Park says:
Finally some reasoning that doesn't rely on stoking Brooklyn-Manhattan resentments. Long travel is definitely a fixed source of stress in a relationship, whether romantic or family. Just because the G line doesn't run from bedroom neighborhoods to workplace districts doesn't mean it's not a vital part of the city's social fabric.
March 21, 2012, 11:23 am
D from Bklyn says:
I'm sure that in this city there are plenty of lovebirds who suffer distances and inconveniences far tougher than those experienced by these two.

Perhaps a better angle for reporting on this subject would be people who rely on the G to get to work in order to put food on their table.

Move on, people. There's nothing to see here.
March 21, 2012, 12:29 pm
Or from Yellow Hook says:
Answer to Swampyankee:

If your girlfriend cycles over to see you, she might realize she doesn't need you, particularly if there are cobblestones.
March 21, 2012, 12:51 pm
adamben from bedstuy says:
you mean more superficial relationships will be breaking up since people have been known to travel more than 20mins for someone that they are actually in love with. just sayin'.
March 21, 2012, 1:14 pm
BunnynSunny from Clinton Hill says:
This is the best news I've read all week!
March 21, 2012, 1:34 pm
courtney from bushwick says:
white wine?

brooklyn has bigger problems than long-distance hipsters!
March 21, 2012, 2:58 pm
Tony G from Cobble Hill says:
How hard is it to make a transfer to the F train ?

LAZY LAZY LAZY !
March 21, 2012, 3:51 pm
anywho says:
The G train has sucked for thirty years. If it ran through the Upper West Side this would not be happening.
March 21, 2012, 4:38 pm
anywho says:
The G train has sucked for thirty years. If it ran through the Upper West Side this would not be happening.
March 21, 2012, 4:38 pm
Scott from Park Slope says:
The G train extension has been great. Being able to travel directly from Windsor Terrace to Queens has created a lot of business, artistic, and recreational cross-pollination. It has created new patterns of movement that benefit local businesses in Queens and Brooklyn. Want to see shows at Galapagos in Williamsburg? Easy. Want to have dinner with friends in Long Island City? Easy. Want to check out the new restaurant in Park Slope? Easy.

This dynamic will be especially important when the basketball stadium is completed and the area around Atlantic/Flatbush goes into hyperdrive. The G, and its attendant benefits, should stay as it is.
March 21, 2012, 5:14 pm
Dave from Park Slope says:
There are numerous good reasons for saving the G train extension, but for once SwampYankee is right: it's a short and pleasant 41-minute bicycle ride from Greenwood Heights to Nassau Avenue: http://g.co/maps/awju2.

Or keeps his perfect record intact, though: no, one doesn't need a car in Brooklyn.
March 21, 2012, 6:09 pm
Skellatosis from Bk says:
Hipster doofus.
March 21, 2012, 8:35 pm
Mariya from Windsor Terrace says:
the second quote should actually read: "My girlfriend lives in Park Slope and we’ll have to break up if the G line extension stops... because I don't actually love her enough to wait five minutes to connect from the F to the G"
March 21, 2012, 9:47 pm
Mariya from Windsor Terrace says:
the second quote should actually read: "My girlfriend lives in Park Slope and we’ll have to break up if the G line extension stops... because I don't actually love her enough to wait five minutes to connect from the F to the G"
March 21, 2012, 9:47 pm
Mariya from Windsor Terrace says:
the second quote should actually read: "My girlfriend lives in Park Slope and we’ll have to break up if the G line extension stops... because I don't actually love her enough to wait five minutes to connect from the F to the G"
March 21, 2012, 9:48 pm
Nabil from Bronx says:
Maybe this will cause them to finally move in together
March 21, 2012, 10:50 pm
fatimah from cobble hill says:
Sounds like true love. My father went to Vietnam for a year and my mother waited from him. That's about 7,000 G-train rides. They are still happily married after 57 years.
March 22, 2012, 6:50 am
Al Pel from Bay Ridge says:
Bike! It makes everything just a short ride away, especially the combination of subway bike. Plus, it's a little romantic, no, to daydream of your love whilst cycling on your way to see them?

Not that I like transportation cuts, but there's an easy solution.
March 22, 2012, 2:31 pm
Al Pel from Bay Ridge says:
SwampYankee, you took the words right out of my mouth! We even phrased it similarly.
March 22, 2012, 2:33 pm
Jorge from Greenpoint. says:
Can you all please move back to Iowa? Please?
March 22, 2012, 7:22 pm
Scott from Park Slope says:
Al Pel & Swamp Yankee: Biking is excellent, but it is not always weather and situation appropriate. For example, if you have any amount of cargo or children, it is not appropriate. If there are inches of snow on the ground or rain lashing the streets in waves, it is not appropriate.

So, on those grounds having a subway line that connects Brooklyn directly to Queens makes sense. It also makes sense from an economic perspective. If you want the city to develop along multi-polar lines, then it makes sense to depart from the hub-and-spoke model.

My family frequently has business in Queens. It has been very nice to be able to get there without a 40-minute detour in Manhattan. We also frequently have business in Williamsburg, and again, it has been nice to be able to go there directly without doubling our travel times because the local subway must pass through Manhattan first.

The G's extension needs to stay, and interconnectedness between non-Manhattan boroughs must increase. It leads to many, many more economic possibilities and chances for the city to grow in new, exciting ways.
March 23, 2012, 5:52 pm

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