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Hoyt–Schermerhorn station

Peeling ceiling is latest problem for G train riders

The Brooklyn Paper

G train riders already feel like the rug is getting pulled out from under them — now they feel like the ceiling is coming down on top of them as well.

Water damage is causing paint to flake and a funky liquid to drip on straphangers at the Hoyt-Schermerhorn Street station, grossing out commuters who live in fear that the Metropolitan Transportation Authority will soon ax a beloved five-stop extension of the line that links North and Brownstone Brooklyns.

Dilapidated ceilings — marked by calcified grime, badly peeling paint, and rusted pillars — give the station’s two center platforms a horror-movie aesthetic, straphangers say.

“It has a grungy, dingy, and generally cryptic feeling,” said Gene Russianoff of the transit-advocacy group Straphangers Campaign.

The well-used is a major transfer point that links the so-called Brooklyn Local to the A and C trains. The station boasts six tracks, although the outer two aren’t in use — which is part of the reason why film crews often shoot in the station.

Hoyt-Schermerhorn played a big part in the movie “Coming to America” and Michael Jackson’s video “Bad,” but commuters shouldn’t expect a Hollywood-style makeover anytime soon.

An MTA spokesman said the station will receive a fresh coat of paint by 2015, but did not respond to specific requests for comment about the dripping ceiling.

Train advocates — who are fighting to save added G train stops in Kensington, Windsor Terrace, and Park Slope from elimination — had plenty to say.

“It’s unpleasant,” said Russianoff. “G train riders have a lot to complain about.”

The MTA added service to the only train that never suffers the injustice of entering Manhattan after it began a $257.5 million renovation of the Culver Viaduct. When work wraps up next winter, the agency is no longer obligated to keep running G trains at the Fourth Avenue–Ninth Street, Seventh Avenue, Prospect Park–15th Street, Fort Hamilton Parkway, and Church Avenue stations.

Reach reporter Natalie O'Neill at noneill@cnglocal.com or by calling her at (718) 260-4505.

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Reader Feedback

BunnynSunny from The Hill says:
Hoyt-Schermerhorn is the grossest, foulest subway station I've ever been. On the G line side to Queens, garbage fills the track, rats run everywhere. There is water leaking down onto the platform so that you cannot stand in many places. It is disgusting, and the MTA does not a thing about it.
March 29, 2012, 10:04 am
ladyperson from greenpoint says:
H-S is pretty bad. One of the few stations in the system where you open your umbrella on the PLATFORM if it's pouring rain. But I have to add Broadway station is pretty foul too. A constant running river in the tracks, rust stains and dripping paint from the ceilings, unbelievably gross.
March 29, 2012, 10:27 am
ladyperson from greenpoint says:
H-S is pretty bad. One of the few stations in the system where you open your umbrella on the PLATFORM if it's pouring rain. But I have to add Broadway station is pretty foul too. A constant running river in the tracks, rust stains and dripping paint from the ceilings, unbelievably gross. Not to mention the smell of excrement...
March 29, 2012, 10:27 am
STEVE from DOWNTOWN says:
BUT: the station has history and an old NY feel. As a kid, my mom used to take me by the hand through the station. It was so scary but thrilling at the same time. I remember the old Chcklets penny vending machines. Speaking of thrilling.. it's a shame the MTA never parlayed the station as a tourist destination for the Jackson Faithful. Other cities would have.Typical NYC stupidity. Anyway..SAVE THE SCHERM !
March 29, 2012, 12:08 pm
Echo from NYC says:
HOWEVER: H-S has a past and vintage NYC vibe. When I was a child, my father would often walk me through the premises. While it was a blast it was also quite terrifying. I recall the old dispenser machines for just a penny. You wanna talk about crazy...it's too bad Jermaine Jackson never performed "Faithful" in this station-it's seems the tourists would love this. I know other places wouldn't have hesitated. Silly New York. Anywhooo...I hope this place gets restored.
March 29, 2012, 2:15 pm
Chicken Underwear from Park Slope says:
If only tourist had a reason to be at HOYT–SCHERMERHORN it would be pristine, like many of the Manhattan subway stations south of 96th Street that I am sure see less use
March 29, 2012, 2:16 pm
anywho says:
Chambers Street (J/Z line) is the worst subway train stattion in NYC. It is like a Medieval dungeon.
March 29, 2012, 2:36 pm
Chicken Underwear from Park Slolpe says:
I stand corrected, but only an extreme tourist takes the J/Z
March 29, 2012, 2:49 pm

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