Sections

House of Yes has to raise the roof and needs a liquor license

House of Yay! Acrobats high on new home in Bushwick

The Brooklyn Paper
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like Brooklyn Paper on Facebook.

A scrappy acrobatic arts venue has signed a new lease on life.

The House Of Yes has been homeless since the lease on its Williasmburg space ran out last summer, but its founders inked a deal for new digs in Bushwick on Friday afternoon.

“It hasn’t sunk in yet,” said Anya, an acrobat and aerialist who runs the organization with artists Kae Burke and Elena Delgado. “I have gotten really good at not getting my hopes up in the past six months.”

The new performance parlor will have a larger stage and seating area than the old one, not to mention a smokehouse restaurant, a bar, and an outdoor lounge.

“This space is going to be a little bit more professional and sustainable,” Sapozhnikova said.

The troupe’s new home at the corner of Wyckoff and Jefferson avenues last housed a laundromat and will need an extensive renovation before the new House of Yes can affirmatively open. The circus crew needs to raise the ceiling from its current height of 17 feet to around 30 to accommodate its high-flying classes and shows.

The aerial art house also needs a liquor license before it can open its doors.

“Everything is 100 percent hinging on the liquor license,” said Sapozhnikova. “This place will not be sustainable without it.”

Restaurateur Ilan Telmont, who also owns the recently-opened Bake Shop on Driggs Avenue in Williamsburg as well as three cafes in Manhattan, plans to run the smokehouse and bar in the venue and host “circus brunches” on the weekends.

“There will be people performing, DJs, a fashion show,” said Telmont “Every brunch will be different.”

The team of tumblers will continue to throw shows, run its circus school, The Sky Box, and rent the space out to other entertainers. The organization also plans to begin putting on children’s performances.

“We want to do them once a month on Sundays, with deep discounts for neighborhood kids,” said Sapozhnikova. “We really want to expose the neighborhood kids to circus arts.”

Sapozhnikova said she expects the venue to open in late summer or early fall if all goes well.

Updated 4:29 pm, January 12, 2014: Typo fixed.
Reach reporter Danielle Furfaro at dfurfaro@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-2511. Follow her at twitter.com/DanielleFurfaro.
Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like Brooklyn Paper on Facebook.

Reasonable discourse

brnd from bushwiccan says:
“Everything is 100 percent hinging on the liquor license,” said Sapozhnikova. “This place will not be sustainable with it.”

I think you mean "without it."
Jan. 11, 2014, 10:02 pm
sammm from bushwick says:
@brnd seriously. who edited this ——?
Jan. 12, 2014, 10:39 am
ebk from williamsburg says:
Yes! Looking forward to the new space!!!
Jan. 13, 2014, 3:15 pm
cityrat from clinton hill says:
@samm You did!
Jan. 13, 2014, 5:58 pm

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not BrooklynPaper.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to BrooklynPaper.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.