Sections

Urban-renewal park in Fort Greene up for urban renewal

Secret garden: BAM Park has been locked up for nearly a decade.
The Brooklyn Paper
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like Brooklyn Paper on Facebook.

A long-padlocked Fort Greene park could reopen thanks to a city push to make it safe to hang out in once more.

BAM Park, bounded by Lafayette Avenue and Fulton and Saint Felix streets, has been closed to the public for nine years due to unstable ground, but plans to open it back up are finally moving forward. Mayor DeBlasio announced in mid-July that his administration would pursue fixing up the green-space. The pro-business Downtown Brooklyn Partnership is eager to lend a hand.

“To take back a park that was literally shuttered for so long is really great,” said Andrew Kalish, director of cultural development for the Partnership.

The overgrown park sits above the Fulton G station and around the corner from the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s Peter Jay Sharp building, but despite the park’s name, the cultural institution is not involved with its upkeep. The site is owned by the Department of Housing Preservation and Development, which acquired it as part of an urban renewal program in the early 1980s. The buildings that once stood there had already been torn down when the department took over and designated the spot as a park. In recent years the ground beneath the park became dangerously unstable and the city locked it up.

The lot is sinking and isn’t safe to be in, a spokesman for the housing department said.

The Downtown Brooklyn Partnership recently selected an architect to re-design the park, according to the mayor’s office, and raised $2 million from the pro-development Empire State Development Corporation to add to money allocated by Public Advocate Letitia James when she was the neighborhood’s councilwoman, according to the housing department.

Sitting on a triangular block between Fort Greene’s brownstone blocks and the venues that make up the so-called “Brooklyn Cultural District”, the padlocked green triangle’s unkempt foliage stands in contrast to the lively, well-groomed, and also triangular Fowler Square directly across the diagonal intersection.

“We’re really excited to have one more grand entrance to the cultural district,” Kalish said. “And to finish the other side of the bow tie.”

There is not yet a timetable for the project, but the parks department has agreed to take over the site when its done, the housing department spokesman said.

Reach reporter Matthew Perlman at (718) 260-8310. E-mail him at mperlman@cnglocal.com. Follow him on Twitter @matthewjperlman.
Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like Brooklyn Paper on Facebook.

Reasonable discourse

Mom from Clinton Hill says:
Yay! Another place for the kids to play--not.
Aug. 2, 2014, 9:09 pm
Jim from PH says:
Not every park is for kids to play in... or should be... or needs to be... or will be...

Mom -- Here's a list of playgrounds near the 11217 zipcode.

North Pacific Playground
N/S PACIFIC ST, BET NEVINS ST & 3 AVE

Sixteen Sycamores Playground
SCHERMERHORN ST, 3 AVE, NEVINS ST

Dean Playground
DEAN TO BERGEN STS BET 6 & CARLTON AVES

Thomas Greene Playground
3 AVE, NEVINS, DEGRAW & DOUGLAS STS

Park Slope Playground
BERKELEY PL, LINCOLN PL, 5 & 6 AVES

South Oxford Park
SOUTH OXFORD ST, CUMBERLAND ST, ATLANTIC AVE
Parks built this park, including its cat-tailed themed spray shower, first-rate play equipment, swings, safety surfacing, synthetic turf green, tennis courts, steel fences, benches, sidewalks, drinking fountains and gardens, from scratch with the support of the local community after demolishing the tennis club that once stood on its grounds.

Cuyler Gore
FULTON, CUMBERLAND STS, GREENE AVE

Gowanus Playground
HOYT, WYCKOFF, BOND STS (Brooklyn)

Boerum Park
WARREN, SMITH, HOYT & BALTIC STS

Fort Greene Park
DEKALB AVE & CUMBERLAND ST (Brooklyn)
Aug. 4, 2014, 3:37 pm

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not BrooklynPaper.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to BrooklynPaper.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.