Starbucks goes part-bar for second Williamsburg foray

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Starbucks is opening up a second coffee-shop in Williamsburg — and this time it plans to bring the party.

The Seattle coffee chain has applied for a license to sell beer or wine alongside juice and java at the cafe under construction on N. Seventh Street between Bedford Avenue and Berry Street. The move is meant to accommodate neighborhood residents’ tremendous thirst and varied tastes, a rep for the caffeine colossus said.

“We are proud to be a part of Williamsburg and are committed to bringing the right coffee, food, and store experience to each neighborhood we serve,” said Starbucks spokeswoman Haley Drage. “Just as every customer is unique, so are our stores and we consider a broad range of products and services for each location.”

Starbucks sells alcohol in just 30 of its more than 20,000 stores, including in the Seattle, Portland, Southern California, Chicago, and Atlanta locations, as well as in airports in Washington D.C. and Los Angeles. The incognito Starbucks inside a Macy’s store in Manhattan, which lacks Starbucks signage, also sells beer and wine.

The coffee company opened its first Williamsburg location earlier this summer in the Karl Fischer building at the corner of Union Avenue and Ainslie Street.

The company is also considering selling limited-run “reserve” coffee in the N. Seventh Street shop, which might put it in competition with the high-end Greenpoint coffee house Cafe Grumpy and its Nordic counterpart Budin. The latter is home to the famous $10 latte.

Reach reporter Danielle Furfaro at or by calling (718) 260-2511. Follow her at
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Reasonable discourse

first word from Brooklyn says:
Starbucks is everything that's wrong with this country.

Chains that offer sterile environments which are often over priced and take from the local mom-pop startups and long standings ones as well.

It's the small entrepreneurs that made Brooklyn desirable and it's the big business chains that are now ruining it.

All those that shop at Starbucks are guilty of deteriorating entrepreneurship and diversity.

Small businesses make for a stronger and more self reliant economy.

Break the chains!
Aug. 20, 2014, 6:39 am
Carpenters Rat Patrol from Williamsburg says:
As of late Starbucks uses contractors like Piece Management Incorporated that do not pay area labor standard wages & benefits to their carpenters when constructing their stores in NYC. Shame on Starbucks for hurting NY workers!
Oct. 24, 2014, 8:56 am

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