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Youngsters try, fail to steal man’s backpack full of cash

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90th Precinct

Southside–Williamsburg

Money mule

A trio of bullies attacked a middle-aged man and tried to steal his backpack on Graham Avenue on Jan. 13, cops said.

The 50-year-old victim reported that he was walking between Ainslie and Powers streets at 5 pm when three young toughs spun him around and tried to pull his knapsack off of his back.

The victim said he hit the back and started yelling for the police, which caused the threesome to beat it without the bag, which so happened to contain $8,000 in cash. No word on where the money came from.

Home depot

A thief broke into a carpenter’s parked van on Johnson Avenue on Jan. 13 and stole thousands of dollars worth of tools, cops said.

The 30-year-old victim said he returned to his vehicle, which was parked at the corner of Morgan Avenue, at 8 am to find that it had been burglarized. Someone busted open the lock, pried open the door, and stole a ton of tools — including four drills, two hammers, a grinder, a circular saw, handtools, and a socket set.

There were surveillance cameras on the building, but the police do not yet have suspect.

Gone fishing

An outlaw stole a kayak off the top of a man’s truck parked on Driggs Avenue on Jan. 13, cops said.

The 25-year-old victim told police that he returned to his car, which was parked between Broadway and S. Eighth Street, at 8:30 am, and found the large orange vessel vanished. Police have no suspects.

Thin number

A pair of prowlers pried open a cash machine on Bedford Avenue on Jan. 13 and stole $400, cops said.

The owner of the business between Grand Street and S. First Street told police that the crooks compromised the money dispenser with a crowbar at 5 am.

The duo left another $5,400 in the machine, police said.

A bad plan

A telephone fraudster suckered a businessman into giving away $1,500 in prepaid credit cards on Grand Street on Jan. 11, cops said.

The victim told police that he was at his store between Bedford and Driggs avenues at 2 pm when someone called him and claimed to be from Con Edison. The phony told him that he would need to fork over $1,500 immediately to keep the lights on, cops said.

The victim told police that he purchased three prepaid credit cards for $500 each and then gave the man on the phone the pin numbers. The victim then called Con Edison, who told him that it had never called him and that he had not paid any money on his account, cops reported.

High as luck

An extremely intoxicated drug user did not what, or who, hit him when he got shot on Bedford Avenue on Jan. 14, cops said.

The 20-year-old victim told police that he was high on marijuana and Xanax pills and did not realize that he is been shot in the heel of his right foot until he returned to his house between S. Third and S. Fourth streets at 8 pm. The man was treated at New York University Hospital on Jan. 16, per police.

With teeth

Cops cuffed a man who they say bit a guy on the arm and beat him with a metal chain before running off with his bike on Throop Avenue on Jan. 15.

The 30-year-old victim said he was riding his bike between Walton and Wallabout streets at 8:10 pm when the suspect ran up and bit him on the right arm. The maniac then hit the man in the body with a metal chain and rode off with his Roadmaster, police said.

A 45-year-old suspect was arrested and charged with robbery.

Busy signal

Two bandits stormed into a Havemeyer Street phone store and stole several cellphones at gunpoint on Jan. 16, police reported.

The clerks of the store between S. Third and Borniquen Place told police they were at work at 7:50 pm when one of the men pulled a gun and pointed at them.

“Where are the phones?” one of the robbers supposedly said before jumping behind the counter and grabbing several cellular devices.

The other lout told the workers to go in to the bathroom and lock themselves inside for 30 minutes, claiming he and his accomplice would be watching from outside, according to a police report. The duo then dashed away, cops said.

Bill thrill

A gunman robbed a bank on Grand Street of $1,500 on Jan. 18, cops said.

The bank on the corner of Grand Street and Graham Avenue reported that the raider entered at 12:05 pm and handed the teller a note, which read, “Give me 20s, 50s, 100s or people would get hurt.”

The teller passed the robber some cash, but he demanded hundred-dollar bills and, when she said she did not have any and instead handed him some ones, he fled and left them on the counter, police said.

— Danielle Furfaro

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