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Meet the other mayors of Brooklyn

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Bloomy ain’t the only mayor in town.

Brooklyn is a borough of neighborhoods, and almost every one of them has its own un-elected mayor in charge of everything from hanging Christmas tree lights to negotiating complicated rezonings — all without any official power.

It usually takes years of hard work, a lengthy record of community activism, and some Brooklyn chutzpah to land the lofty-sounding yet informal position.

Once they’re in office — not that they actually have an office — the neighborhood leaders are more town crier than chief executive, but they play an important role in advocating for their communities nonetheless.

South Williamsburg: Isaac Abraham
He might be the Mayor of South Williamsburg, but Hasidic activist Isaac Abraham is actually seeking a demotion.
The hardware store owner is a longshot in the race to represent the neighborhood in the City Council, but his leadership in the Southside has already cemented his legacy.
For 30 years, Abraham’s lengthy resume as mayor includes accomplishments like the implementation of a CB radio-based, stay-at-home neighborhood watch and the rescue of a Jewish girl who was lost in the woods on the border of Connecticut and Massachusetts.
According to Abraham, his greatest skill is his tenacity.
“If you throw me through the door, I come back through the window,” he said.
His supporters say that going from mayor to councilman is a natural progression for a born leader.
“He already has the job, he’s just looking for the official title,” said Leo Moskowitz.

Park Slope: Susan Fox
The Mayor of Park Slope built her own community — an online one that is.
Since Susan Fox founded the seminal Park Slope Parents message board in 2002, the site has become the digital town square of Mom and Pop stores and moms and pops.
Despite her digital achievements, her proudest accomplishment as mayor was adding puppets to the annual Park Slope Children’s Halloween Parade, which she co-chairs.
Community Board 6 District Manger Craig Hammerman called Fox a “ball of energy” and said her online network is an “incredibly invaluable tool” that has created “a network and a voice for parents to communicate.”
For her part, Fox acknowledges that being Mayor of Park Slope is nothing like being Mayor of the city — especially considering finances.
“I don’t have nearly as much money as Bloomberg does, but if I had the money he has, the Halloween Parade would be better,” she said.

Reasonable discourse

Bram Donkers from Breukelen says:
Didn't you forget Ger Mik?
Aug. 27, 2009, 7:13 am
Carolyn Sanders-James from Crown Heights says:
What about Crown Heights
Aug. 27, 2009, 11:34 am
Joe from Williamsburg says:
Yes, if you throw Isaac Abraham through the door, he comes back in through the window...like any criminal.
Aug. 31, 2009, 4:13 pm
Ken from Bushwick says:
Remember criminal is always winners!!!
Aug. 31, 2009, 4:49 pm

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