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City hopes to make the Willy B safer for bikers

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Biking over the Williamsburg Bridge should soon be a lot easier, thanks to a makeover of the ramps on the most heavily cycled bridge in the city.

Department of Transportation workers will begin installing a smooth, resurfaced path separating bikers from pedestrians, the city revealed this week.

According to Brooklyn Borough Commissioner Joseph Palmieri, the new configuration will reduce conflicts between pedestrians and speedy cyclists by creating clearly marked pathways at the Manhattan end of the bridge and separating them entirely into two lanes on the Williamsburg side.

There will also be new signage at the entrances to the cycle paths, to help riders find their way onto the Williamsburg Bridge from the bustling eight-lane entrance on the Manhattan side and the concrete expressway ramps by Havemeyer and S. Fourth streets.

“We believe this configuration will simplify and clarify the path operation for cyclists and pedestrians,” said Palmieri.

Transportation Alternatives spokesperson Wiley Norvell said it “makes sense” to improve the entrances and exits.

“There are a lot of cars on the approach to the Williamsburg Bridge that go into highway mode and there is an incredible amount of speeding,” said Norvell. “You don’t want to be sharing a lane with a vehicle going 45 miles an hour.”

The bridge carries 4,000 cyclists a day at its midsummer peak, city stats show.

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Reader Feedback

Joey from Clinton Hills says:
still very dangerous...there are many very bad drivers among the predominant ethnic groups of the southside (and I don't mean hipsters.)
March 17, 2010, 2:02 pm
Hopper from los sures says:
It's a paint job. what's needed are separate approach lanes on the Manhattan side, in the middle of Delancey Street, starting at, let's say, Essex at least, or farther west. Getting onto & offa the bridge @ Delancey can be hair-raising.
March 18, 2010, 8:13 am
Dav from Greenpoint says:
Joey from Clinton Hills says: still very dangerous…
You know what dangers means? Dangers is bikers are not following rules and regulations like make a full stop for red flashers of yellow school bus wile
Pick up/dropping off kid that’s dangers!!! You guys are not giving respect what so ever…. Remember give respect you get respect!!!! It’s a two way
Street…..
March 18, 2010, 3:48 pm
biker from wburg says:
Dangerous is also running bicyclists on Bedford Ave off the road with your minivans. If your community wants respect from bikers, try giving it to bikers in the first place. It's a two-way street.
March 19, 2010, 10:27 am
Moshe Aron Kestenbaum,ODA from Williamsburg says:
I shaved 2 inches off my ass since I started biking the williamsburg bridge, All I have to say about the bridge is that it FEELS GREAT.
April 7, 2010, 9:22 am
sarahp from bushwick says:
i love how an article about bike safety always has to include some guy complaining about that one dangerous bike rider they saw. as if there aren't several times as many dangerous drivers with big, hulking metal machines going 60 miles an hour on the same road...
July 1, 2010, 5:16 pm

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