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Hey, Brooklyn — learn to drive!

The Brooklyn Paper
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You want a wild ride? Come to Brooklyn!

Borough motorists are wildly violating the city’s vehicular traffic rules, according to stunning traffic data released the NYPD released this week.

Statistics show that cops have written 121,241 moving violations in Brooklyn this year — the most in the city.

Queens came in second with 107,781 violations, Manhattan was third with 97,507, followed by the Bronx (62,652) and Staten Island (23,652).

Well over 30,000 of the tickets were given out in Brownstone Brooklyn, North Brooklyn and Bay Ridge. The biggest offenders were motorists who talk on their cellphones without hands-free devices, but that’s no surprise since the city has held several crack-downs on such gabby drivers.

There’s an enormous amount of data to wade through, so here are a few highlights:

Bay Ridge and Dyker Heights

• Biggest offense: 1,003 tickets for not wearing seat belts.

• Smallest offense: Two violations each to motorists caught backing-up unsafely, failing to keep to the right side of the road and for cars without license plates

• Most surprising offense: 684 tickets were given out to motorists who disobeyed stop signs.

Carroll Gardens and Red Hook

• Biggest offense: 1,327 tickets were given out to drivers talking on their cellphones without hands-free devices.

• Smallest offense: One ticket was given to a motorist who followed the car in front of him too closely.

• Most surprising offense: 110 tickets given out to motorists who had children with them, but no child seats.

Park Slope

• Biggest offense: 829 cellphone summonses.

• Smallest offense: Three tickets to motorists with expired inspections.

• Most surprising offense: 105 tickets were given out to unlicensed drivers.

Brooklyn Heights and DUMBO

• Biggest offense: 801 tickets to motorists making improper turns (likely a result of changes on Tillary Street).

• Smallest offense: Three tickets to commercial vehicles driving on a parkway.

• Most surprising offense: 117 motorists were ticketed for driving the wrong way on a one-way street.

Fort Greene and Clinton Hill

• Biggest offense: 1,163 tickets were for cellphone use.

• Smallest offense: One ticket given out to a driver who failed to yield the right of way.

• Most surprising offense: 850 tickets were given out to motorists ignoring stop signs.

Williamsburg

• Biggest offense: 1,280 tickets for cellphone use.

• Smallest offense: One ticket to a motorist caught driving in a bus lane. Another was written out to someone making an unsafe lane change.

• Most surprising offense: 267 motorists were ticketed for blowing through red lights.

Greenpoint

• Biggest offense: 1,288 summonses for talking on a cellphone without an earpiece.

• Smallest offense: Two tickets were given out to motorists who refused to give pedestrians the right of way.

• Most surprising offense that’s not surprising at all, given how cars use McGuinness Boulevard: 137 tickets for speeding.

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Reader Feedback

Escalade driver from bay ridge says:
So much for the tiresome whining that drivers can disobey any law they choose whenever they want.

June 27, 2011, 12:27 am
Steve Nitwitt from Sheepshead Bay says:
Hey hipsters and undocumented Mexican delivery guys! Learn to ride!
June 27, 2011, 1:12 am
Hank from Brooklyn says:
I suspect many of the tickets were bogus. Cops are driven by the misguided policy of having their performance evaluations based on the number of summonses they issue. TICKET QUOTAS.

Reference: P.O. Adrian Schoolcraft.
June 27, 2011, 2:45 am
Chicken Underwear from Park Slope says:
"The biggest offenders were motorists who talk on their cellphones without hands-free devices, but that’s no surprise since the city has held several crack-downs on such gabby drivers."

No, it is no surprise because of the quantity of drivers who use their cellphones without hands-free devices.

I wish crossing guards could give out those tickets near schools!
June 27, 2011, 4:46 am
adamben from bedstuy says:
lol. in bedstuy i see people blow throw stop signs so much that no one ever crosses even though they have the right of way; everyone waits until there are NO CARS WHATSOEVER before they dare to cross. i get thanked all of the time for waiting at a stop sign and stopping at lights instead of blowing through them.

ps i wonder how this will be taken by the bike haters.
June 27, 2011, 9:17 am
Joe Blow from Bay Ridge says:
"The biggest offenders were motorists who talk on their cellphones without hands-free devices, but that’s no surprise since the city has held several crack-downs on such gabby drivers."

No these were the offenders that were the easiest to catch. What we really need in Bay Ridge is a much more intense crack down on speeding, cars running red lights and cars blowing past stop signs. It looks like the NYPD made some progress in BR by issuing more stop sign tickets, but that is only the tip of the iceberg. The 68th Prec in BR is essentially a retirement home, with uniformed patrol offiers renowed for their laziness and willingness to ignore obvious traffic violations.
June 27, 2011, 9:44 am
Brian from Brighton Beach says:
I'm confused. This is a site about "Brooklyn" although you named only about 7,000 violations in 11 neighborhoods? There are countless neighborhoods you are missing in this article and this site overall. It's really sad that you don't cater to all Brooklynites.
June 27, 2011, 12:41 pm
Spectre from Brooklyn says:
The statistics have to be divided by either the number of people living in each borough or the number of vehicles registered in each borough to be an apples to apples comparison, otherwise if one borough has substantial more vehicles than another borough, the borough with the higher vehicle count will likely have more violations, on average. But if you divide by the population or vehicles then Brooklyn is not as bad as Manhattan.
June 27, 2011, 2:55 pm
LOLcat from Park Slope says:
LOL @ Escalade driver. Drivers get away with murder (this is LITERAL). Police could get a huge raise if they actually enforced most driving laws such as:

Running red lights
Honking for anything but danger (illegal in most areas)
Not signaling
Failing to yield properly
U-turns

You ever want to kill someone, hit them with a car and say it was an accident.
June 27, 2011, 3:49 pm

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