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The Prospect Park Residence at One Prospect Park West is set to close in June

‘Cash-strapped’ Prospect Park West nursing home to shutter in three months

The Brooklyn Paper
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A high-end assisted living facility on Prospect Park West will shutter in three months, forcing more than 100 elderly residents to find new digs.

Financial woes forced the 134-unit Prospect Park Residence to close, according to managers, who say taxes on the center increased by about $1 million this year.

“Today, despite its best efforts, Prospect Park Residence is no longer viable,” said Prospect Park Residence director David Pomerantz in a statement on Wednesday night. “This was not an easy decision.”

A closure plan was approved by the state Department of Health last week. The facility at One Prospect Park West has pledged to help tenants locate new homes and aid employees in finding new work.

Some dejected residents said they are not sure where they will lay their heads come June.

“What can I say? There’s nothing I can do,” said Eleanor Greif, 94.

The nine-story building was built in 1931 in place of a public garage and was used as a fraternal clubhouse — complete with ballrooms and bowling alleys — before it became a nursing home in 1962. Current management took over in the late 1990s and put in medical offices below floors of assisted living apartments.

The building occupies a block-long chunk of prime real estate at the corner of Prospect Park West and Plaza Street West, on Grand Army Plaza. It sits across President Street from 9 Prospect Park West, where Sen. Charles Schumer (D–New York) owns and apartment with his wife City University of New York vice chancellor Iris Weinshall and where actor Chloe Sevigny bought a pad for $2 million in December.

Some residents railed against the closing at a closed-door, Wednesday night meeting announcing the plan and said no tenants were consulted, according to a source who attended the meeting.

Councilman Brad Lander (D–Park Slope), Assemblywoman Joan Millman (D–Park Slope), and Assemblyman James Brennan (D–Park Slope, called on building owner Haysha Deitsch to stop the closure, saying that the sudden move could be “traumatic” for the seniors.

The nursing home has seen its share of controversies. Former civil Judge John Phillips suffered serious neglect there, according to a wrongful death suit filed by Philips’s nephew, Samuel Boykin, in 2011. Another lawsuit alleged that the facility operated for years without a license and that its negligence led to the death of at least one dementia patient, according to the New York Daily News.

Updated 1:19 pm, March 7, 2014: Reaction from politicians added.
Reach reporter Megan Riesz at mriesz@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-4505. Follow her on Twitter @meganriesz.
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Reasonable discourse

Michele from Brooklyn says:
Cash strapped? How about cash plus? These folks bought this with a sell in mind, once the tax abatement was over...who gives a hoot about old people anyway, right?
March 6, 2014, 6:24 pm
amv from center slope says:
@bart johnson, knowing that Chloe Sevigny is polluting Park Slope with presence, elderly who are euthanized are getting off easy.
March 7, 2014, 10:46 am
Charles from PS says:
Kicking old people out of their homes is not in our society's interest, especially when someone takes the responsibility, and money, of elderly people for their care. Of note, former residents of this facility just lost a Federal lawsuit against the owners. Someone should refer this to the attorney general for an investigation, and seek to halt the sale. How can we allow people to take charge of elderly individuals and then leave them when the value of the real estate gets too high? I say too bad. Eat the costs and do what you promised to do. And if you can't, sell to an organization that can complete the work you started.
March 7, 2014, 1:45 pm
Louisa Ruby from Park Slope says:
PPR’s last two quarterly tax statements dated November 30, 2012 and November 22, 2013 show that PPR’s annual taxes for these years were as follows:

2012: $1,092,586
2013: $1,147,262

Thus, over that period, PPR’s taxes increased a total of only $54,676.
March 7, 2014, 1:47 pm
Lisel Burns, BSEC Leader (Retired) from Park Slope says:
I was appreciative of the tax information correction above.

Hopefuly the families can organize resistance and at the least a major slow down in timetable if the eviction is unstoppable. Just up Prospect Park West, the Brooklyn Society For Ethical Culture has three BSEC member or friend families at the Residence, and I'm thinking that they will support community meetings at their Meeting house 53 Prospect Park West. www.bsec.org.
March 7, 2014, 5:36 pm
Peter from Park Slope says:

I'm with Charles. This needs to be closely examined.
Suddenly they are broke. All these nursing home
operators who suddenly go "broke".
They all need to be massively investigated.
March 10, 2014, 1 pm
Karen George from Daughter of a PPW resident says:
Where is my poor mother going to go???
She moved here from California 5 years ago to be close to her daughter and granddaughter ,she has stuck with the cold winters now to be displaced and live nowhere near her family how sad!!!
March 11, 2014, 11:33 pm
eugene forsyth from Kingsbridge,"THE BRONX"! says:
IF THEY MUST CLOSE, I SUGGEST THEY LOOK AT MY PLACE.KITTAY HOUSE, OPPOSITE THE BRONX VA MEDICAL CENTER AND THREE BLOCKS FROM THE ARMORY. THE #4 TRAIN IS
4 BLOCKS AWAY AND THE B/D LINE 7 BLOCKS AWAY. BUSES RUN ON KINGSBRIDGE RD. TO THESE TRAINS AND TO FORDHAM RD.

KITTAY HOUSE IS PART OF JEWISH HOME LIFE CARE AND IS UNDER STATE REVIEW.
STUDIOS BEGIN AT A LOW $2,000 AND 1 BRS. AT ABOUT $3,400. a MINIMAL BREAKFAST IS SERVED FROM 8-9 AM AND LUNCH AND SUPPER TOO. THERE IS A MINIMAL FOOD PREPARATION ALCOVE WHICH INCLUDES A SMALL MICROWAVE AND A SMALL FRIDGE.
HOUSEKEEPING IS INCLUDED. MOST OF THE RESIDENTS HAVE AN AIDE, AND, OR A WALKER OR WHEEL CHAIR.
March 24, 2014, 8:15 pm
Natasha from Bronx says:
Dear eugene forsyth from Kingsbridge: people in Park Slope have had income base rent. How you deal with it? If you really want to help old people or jast use their problem for your business.
June 19, 2014, 11:53 am

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