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B. David Walsh’s ‘Extracted Bedroom Project’ at Open Source Gallery

An artist is moving his entire bedroom into a Park Slope gallery

The Brooklyn Paper
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It is art irritating life.

Park Slope artist B. David Walsh will move his entire bedroom, including all his own paintings and sculptures, into Open Source Gallery in Park Slope this week for an installation called “Extracted Bedroom Project.” While his belongings are on display, Walsh will live in the emptied room back home for the next 22 days, streaming his simplified existence back to the gallery and over the internet.

“It’s an exhibit within an exhibit, within a performance-piece,” Walsh said.

The idea behind the project is that Walsh’s art is usually on display in his bedroom, and thus that is the way it is meant to be seen — intermingled among his personal affects. He said the notion came about when the gallery’s executive director came to his apartment to see his work and asked him how he’d like to show it.

“I said, ‘Just like this,’ ” Walsh said.

A construction worker by trade, Walsh said he will meticulously reconstruct his bedroom in the gallery space, framing out walls and windows. He will then schlep his things the few blocks from his apartment to Open Source. Well, everything except for his fish tank.

“I have to feed them,” he said.

Walsh’s paintings are mostly done on cabinet-grade plywood and utilize other elements of his profession, such as acrylic paint typically used on walls, he said. He also makes sculptures with found objects and fragments.

The installation was initially just going to be Walsh’s room and works in the gallery. But with the room empty of his art and artifacts, Walsh said he figured he might as well document his life in the blank bedroom. The footage will be streamed live to a screen in the gallery, showing the artist’s work in the setting where he lives, while he lives somewhere else.

“If you want to creep on me and see what I’m up to, you can,” Walsh said.

Even he thinks the whole thing is a bit nuts.

“Can you believe I’ve agreed to do this?” he said.

“Extracted Bedroom” at Open Source Gallery [306 17th St. between Fifth and Sixth avenues in Park Slope, (646) 279–3969, www.open-source-gallery.org]. Opening reception Feb. 7 at 7–9 pm. Exhibition runs through March 1. Free.

Reach reporter Matthew Perlman at (718) 260–8310. E-mail him at mperlman@cnglocal.com. Follow him on Twitter @matthewjperlman.
Updated 10:17 pm, July 9, 2018
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Reasonable discourse

Homey from Crooklyn says:
Moronic nonsense.
Feb. 6, 2015, 9:15 am

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