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The lobster is re-signed

The Brooklyn Paper
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A classic Brooklyn Heights restaurant will turn off its lights for the last time this week, unplugging an iconic sign that has glowed on Montague Street for decades.

On March 16, the 72-year-old Armando’s Restaurant will serve its final meal before turning off that lobster sign, which neighbors fought to preserve — albeit briefly.

“It’s a beautiful sign and it lights up the whole block,” said Homer Fink, publisher of the Brooklyn Heights Blog. “It’s been here for many decades, so I thought, ‘Why not try to save something as iconic as the lobster?’”

Fink led the “Save the Lobster” campaign on his blog, drawing support from state Senate candidate Dan Squadron (obviously using the lobster as a springboard to office!), but the movement got stuck in a trap.

“Initially there was a lot of support for the lobster, but it never turned into the kind of groundswell we anticipated,” Fink said. “Then we found out that Spicy Pickle was coming and we realized that if they put up a giant neon pickle it would be awesome!”

Spicy Pickle, a Denver sub franchise will open at 143 Montague St. early in the summer.

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Reader Feedback

tom from heights says:
LOL

"...got stuck in a trap."

LOL
March 14, 2008, 4:45 pm

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