Today’s news:

Snack Dragon brings Manhattan’s edible nightcaps to S. Fourth Street

Stay up and eat up: Manhattan late-night eatery comes to Williamsburg

The Brooklyn Paper

Drunk and hungry? A new Williamsburg eatery can solve one of those problems.

Late-night booze hounds have another place to soak up their evening’s excesses now that the legendary Manhattan eatery Snack Dragon has crossed the river to serve Brooklyn its famous food nightcaps.

Hungry night owls can visit the shack to enjoy its small menu of tacos and snacks, including a vegan mac and cheese — which is made with quinoa — as late as 4 am on Fridays and Saturdays.

The centerpiece of the menu is the “dragon” taco, which uses pork instead of actual dragon meat.

“I hope that it’s going to be a combination of late-night people and people who want a quick, non-pretentious, healthy meal,” said owner Josephine Jansen.

The snack shack maintains its signature vibe, complete with dusky blue paint and taco slingers who blast bombastic tunes.

But moving to its new S. Fourth Street location between Bedford and Driggs avenues wasn’t easy, said Jansen.

“I’ve been looking over [in Brooklyn] forever and ever, but the rents are so high,” she said. “I found a reasonably-priced place in kind of a ghetto block, but it’s changing quickly.”

Snack Dragon (155 S. Fourth St. between Bedford Ave & Driggs Ave).

Reach reporter Danielle Furfaro at dfurfaro@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-2511. Follow her at twitter.com/DanielleFurfaro.

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JAZ from Hunting Redbeards says:
Late night drunken vegan mac and cheese. I love how a group of people who get drunk every night, mess around with every drug they can find, and smoke American Spirits like chimneys are pretending to be so concerned with their diet being vegan and organic and farm to table or whatever other attention getting nonsense they love to claim. I bet Caleb and Ethan can't find vegan mac and cheese back home in Ohio!!! Like yahhhhhhh.
March 26, 2013, 7:22 am
Mike from Williamsburg says:
You're right. It is probably harder to find vegan food in Ohio. You always act like people are coming from Ohio and bringing their vegan ways and their bicycling habits with them but those things don't exist so much in Ohio. You need to accept that those are Brooklyn traits. The college-educated American immigrants to the borough that you resent are Brooklyn. The foreign immigrants to the borough that you most likely resent are also Brooklyn. And the third generation natives composed entirely of resentment aren't Brooklyn. Your time is over.
March 26, 2013, 7:46 am
diehipster from Electricuting Ethans says:
Hipsters, they invented: late-night, food, Brooklyn, bikes, music, art, craft ales, farming, and a bunch of other new inventions.......

And the mystery continues: How does an overly tattooed, bedhead hair-do having, starving artist who parties every night getting drunk and high then getting 2AM vegan munchies and wakes up at noon to go get "bean to cup" coffee and discuss "progressive rock, post modern art, and obscure poetry" afford to live in a $2000 a month apartment and have the entire Apple product line?

Hmmm? The world will never know.

YAHHH DAYUDE! BREUCKELEN RAWKS!
March 26, 2013, 7:52 am
diehipster from Electricuting Ethans says:
Mike from Ye Olde Villemsbourgen:

We don't resent any foreigners from other countries or within America that come here and act normal; that's been happening for centuries and was always just fine. We resent the masses of tryhard artists and musicians that need so much attention they will carry around instruments they cant play; books they don't read; and eat and drink what they're other trustfunded counterpart "foodies" are eating and drinking all while dressing in costumes and hipster uniforms everyday. And most importantly: THESE BASTARDS HAVE DOUBLED AND TRIPLED RENTS IN WORKING CLASS NEIGHBORHOODS ALL WITHIN ABOUT A DECADE.

What a joke! Ok I'm done for today. Have fun explaining how I'm DEAD WRONG and DELUSIONAL.
March 26, 2013, 8:01 am
Mike from Williamsburg says:
I won't say you're dead wrong, Mr. Hipster. I will say you should be taking issue with what JAZ said instead of what I said. He had a conniption because the word "vegan" appeared on a website. You're also making "act normal" carry a heavy load in your argument. All In the Family was a funny show because we laughed at Archie Bunker's resentments. But Archie Bunker is not a guide to manners or public policy. Your schtick is the 2013 version of Archie Bunker. The original was better.
March 26, 2013, 8:21 am
Dennis sinneD from Williamsburg says:
If DieHipster is Archie Bunker, then who are you, "Mike from Williamsburg"? Edith Bunker. Perennial dingbat?

DH has a problem with rhetoric but his point is valid. What has this gentrification traded for its displacement? That should make those who are displaced willing participants in their displacement, but instead, to your fury, egad, actually resist against that which harms them? I will copy-paste from public comments in the NY Times article, "Gauging Artists' Contribution to Property Values":

"If we are really talking about “art” and “artists” in the gentrification of Williamsburg then our focus should fall on the actual production of that demographic during their time in Williamsburg. Makes sense, right? But the production of the agents of gentrification defies classification. In the years leading up to and past mainstream consciousness of Williamsburg’s gentrification (approx. 1985-1995), the agents of that gentrification produced no consistent school of thought, literature, aesthetic or media by which any valid taxonomy can be distilled. Furthermore, the agents of gentrification left behind no architectural or cultural artifact that allows for contextualization of their activities, and individual artifacts from that period further confound. While it is true that there were/are more galleries in Williamsburg than the Lower East Side, one can see punk rock in the early 1970s, for example, as unique to the geography of the Lower East Side, leaving behind evidence of its occurrence, consistent enough to determine mores, values and circumstances of the people encompassing the history of that gentrification. Trite as it seems, for years, if one wanted to understand the gentrification of the Bowery and the Lower East Side, one could at least visit CBGBs, and if one looked past its galaxy of egoes and personalities and considered CBGBs in geographic terms, one could see the juxtaposition between the people who frequented CBGBs and the people who lived “around the corner”—who, interestingly enough, were mostly Puerto Rican. That possibility escapes the gentrification of Williamsburg—very little, if anything, has endured (unless one counts Earwax on Bedford Avenue, which, indeed, has to be “endured”). None of the galleries, eateries, businesses, associations from that period have survived. In fact, it seems such lack emerged thematically in the production of the agents of gentrification in what is possibly the only true Williamsburg style: apathetic nothingness, except that this apathetic nothingness was inflated towards high-minded “nihilism,” “angst” and “alienation.” Sure, there were/are “political artists” in Williamsburg, but these were/are involved with community organizations and their style melded along those cultural lines. In terms of music production and style, there was little that was indigenous to the activity in this period—serving more to intersect between punk rock from the Lower East Side, and the grunge and alternative of national consciousness. Ultimately, the gentrification produced no Williamsburg style that can be reduced, or elevated (really), to terms like “secular aestheticism,” that in any way, shape or form can be compared, even figuratively, to “religion,” much less corresponding to forms like Hasidism or Pentecostalism that function historically across human society, and in Williamsburg. The intent behind the application of such terms is to valorize, not analyze, the agents of gentrification.

It’s no small irony that the procession that walks back and forth Bedford Avenue cannot even tell why or how gentrification has occurred, except that “artists” did it, and “hipsters” have inherited it. It’s not that the frames of reference elude them—it’s that they don’t exist, and all this talk of “secular aestheticism” is meant to further obfuscate who the actual agents of gentrification were, by again confusing ethnicity with vocation. But let’s make no mistake about it—indeed, race and ethnicity are germane to this discussion, as “artist” obfuscates the actual demographics of the agents of gentrification since their entry into Williamsburg in the early 1980s. You see, if how we understand “art” or “artist” is too broad for the category of people who were calling themselves “artists,” if we argue that those category of persons did not innovate or constitute a style that was unique and germane to the landscape, then we can conclude that, indeed, “art” and “artists” preceded the gentrification of Williamsburg. If so, then we have to do away with looking at “art” and “artists” as sine qua non for gentrification. In fact, gentrification precedes Williamsburg in multiple locations all over the world, and exists in locales like Harlem and the South Bronx, even in downtown Brooklyn, where it occurs and has occurred without the input or activity of “art” and “artists” (at least, not the secular aesthetic kind), further emphasizing the need for critical re-evaluation of the categories of people who function as agents of gentrification. There exists a more plausible common denominator between the agents of gentrification than “art,” namely, that they were a body of middle and upper middle class white (recent) college graduates, transient (by virtue of their recent college graduations), comprising the generation after white flight, who migrated into a locale where college education was and remains in desiderata. Sure, there were white people in Williamsburg, but the agents of gentrification first concentrated in largely Polish immigrant working-class sectors, and, to paraphrase Thorstein Veblen, “the spirit of the college campus ran through them.” The social differences between the agents of gentrification and the Poles were as great as the differences between the Poles and the Puerto Ricans. The designation of “art” and “artist” as quasi-ethnicity is meant to obfuscate these facts, which remain unexplored."
March 26, 2013, 8:56 am
Will from I am Burg says:
I am also sure that the neighbors of this new business appreciate that the owner referred to their location as being on a "kind of a ghetto block". I guess that it isn't vegan enough for them.
March 26, 2013, 9:24 am
Mike from Williamsburg says:
Dennis, I will copy and paste from the Urban Dictionary.

1. tl;dr
Literally, "Too long; didn't read"

Said whenever a nerd makes a post that is too long to bother reading.
"omg you postwench. i can only say one thing in response - tl;dr"
"tl;dr...why dont you give up on your unabridged edition of War and Peace or at least stop posting it here?"
http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=tl%3Bdr

But I think that in general, making cogent and concise arguments is better than copying and pasting from other websites. I hope you agree and never do that again.
March 26, 2013, 9:43 am
Dennis sinneD from Williamsburg says:
Fortunately for me, Mike, other people are not anti-intellectual while simultaneously implying their "cultural superiority." Yes, I know it's too long for you. Much like understanding gentrification is. So I post it with an eye towards others unlike yourself who will read it. And, given that numerous others have made the same observation subsequent to this posting, unlike anything you have ever written, knowledge gets around.
March 26, 2013, 9:50 am
Dennis sinneD from Williamsburg says:
And towards long copy-pasting from dictionaries [I like the definition that especially identifies you as an 'ornament']:

ding·bat
noun /ˈdiNGˌbat/ 
dingbats, plural

A stupid or eccentric person

A typographical device other than a letter or numeral (such as an asterisk), used to signal divisions in text or to replace letters in a euphemistically presented vulgar word

a silly empty-headed person; "you would be a dingbat even to try it"; "yet here he was with an upper class dingbat who just happened to be married to his sister"

A dingbat is an ornament, character or spacer used in typesetting, sometimes more formally known as a "printer's ornament" or "printer's character".

A dingbat is a type of formulaic apartment building that flourished in the Sun Belt region of the United States in the 1950s and 1960s, a vernacular variation of shoebox style "stucco boxes". Dingbats are boxy, two- or three-story apartment houses with overhangs sheltering street-front parking. ...

Dingbats is the name of a board game that was devised by Paul Sellers and is currently manufactured by Ravensburger. The game, for two or more people, involves solving rebuses (puzzles in which a common word or saying is hidden in a cryptic or otherwise unique arrangement of symbols). ...

A silly or stupid person; A special ornamental typographical symbol, such as a bullet, an arrow, a pointing hand etc; An architectural style of apartment building, where the second storey overhangs an area for parking cars

(dingbats) Typefaces that consist of symbol characters such as decorations, arrows and bullets.

(Dingbats) Typographical symbols and ornaments.

(Dingbats) An iconic character glyph, such as a star, a flower, a little square box. There are special iconic fonts, such as Zapf Dingbats and Wingdings, which contain these ornamental characters instead of letters.

(Dingbats) a font consisting of symbols and line art images.

(Dingbats) special characters used to design elements.

(Dingbats) utility characters that include icons, symbols, fleurons, and ornaments

A special symbol not a part of any particular typeface, including arrows, mathematical signs such as square root, and bullets.

Any typographical devise used for ornamentation.

term derived from typographic characters that extend beyond the normal alphabet: @#* and used to describe buildings (usually apartments) that sport characters and symbols as decorative elements

A decorative pi character which is not a letter or mathematical symbol, but more likely a pictogram or icon. Common dingbats include decorative arrows, pointing hands, vehicles, etc,.

A typographical character subject to scorn because it has no apparent relation to the alphabet. Many dingbats are pictograms - tiny pictures of telephones, skiers, airplanes, churches, and the like, used in the travel industry. Others are more abstract. (return to top)

Typographic symbol, such as a bullet (•), used for emphasis or decoration.

An ornament used in typesetting to add space around an image or a symbol.

a foolish or silly person; also, an object serving as a missile

An ornamental character such as a bullet, star, or flower used by printers to decorate a page.

Ornamental character that may be used for signifying the end of a section of text.

A non-alphabetic character such as a bullet, star, tick, arrow or flower, usually relatively simple rather than highly stylised or ornamented. ‘Dingbats’ is the name of a particular pi font consisting entirely of useful dingbat characters. cf ornament.

A professional itinerant beggar. (Term with two probable origins: 1. Dingy means “shabby”, and bat means to blink an eye. Most beggars were shabby [tattered clothing], could look a person in the eye, and could ask for handouts without batting an eye. 2. Dingy as in “1″ above. ...

Slang term for a small swab made of rope and used for drying decks.

someone who is a fool; eccentric person
March 26, 2013, 9:59 am
J from Crooklyn says:
If you were smart you would of bought real estate when it was cheap in the burg. I am not seeing any complaints from the people selling their property.

I would love for this to happen in my hood.
March 26, 2013, 10:51 am
J from Crooklyn says:
If you were smart you would of bought real estate when it was cheap in the burg. I am not seeing any complaints from the people selling their property.

I would love for this to happen in my hood.
March 26, 2013, 10:51 am
J from Crooklyn says:
If you were smart you would of bought real estate when it was cheap in the burg. I am not seeing any complaints from the people selling their property.

I would love for this to happen in my hood.
March 26, 2013, 10:51 am
J from Crooklyn says:
If you were smart you would of bought real estate when it was cheap in the burg. I am not seeing any complaints from the people selling their property.

I would love for this to happen in my hood.
March 26, 2013, 10:51 am
J from Crooklyn says:
If you were smart you would of bought real estate when it was cheap in the burg. I am not seeing any complaints from the people selling their property.

I would love for this to happen in my hood.
March 26, 2013, 10:51 am
J from Crooklyn says:
If you were smart you would of bought real estate when it was cheap in the burg. I am not seeing any complaints from the people selling their property.

I would love for this to happen in my hood.
March 26, 2013, 10:51 am
Mike from Williamsburg says:
Dennis, I'm not saying I have cultural superiority to you. Other than making a reference to a 70s sitcom, I haven't said anything about culture at all, and I don't believe Archie Bunker gets me on any high brow lists. I'm saying I have intellectual superiority to you. That's because you think being long winded is a sign of intelligence. It is not. As Blaise Pascal said, "je n'ai fait celle-ci plus longue que parce que je n'ai pas eu le loisir de la faire plus courte." Or "sorry my letter's so long. I didn't have time to make it short."

In that spirit, quit being so lazy and summarize your arguments into something cogent and concise. I'll engage you on the merits of your argument if you learn how to argue, but if you want to copy and paste your ramblings from other websites, I'll only engage in a meta-argument about how bad you are at this commenting game.
March 26, 2013, 11:04 am
tom from ft greene says:
Do you guys not realize how idiotic you look with your public arguments?
March 26, 2013, 11:04 am
JAZ from Hunting Redbeards says:
Mike - It's a shame that what Dennis posted is too long for you to read, because it is pretty interesting and makes very good points. This North Brooklyn brand of gentrification is largely about self-absorption, and 'coolness' as a consumer product redefined by a lily white so-called creative class who comes from a non-urban setting but uses the existing backdrop as cynical currency in their self-absorption.
March 26, 2013, 11:51 am
Dennis sinneD from Williamsburg says:
"Mike from Williamsburg", you have never responded to any of my points--assuming you're one individual person banging those keys. Instead, you have indeed implied but not claimed cultural superiority to me by repeatedly emphasizing my word count, syntax, sentence structure, parsing, yadda yadda yadda. Only once have you deemed fit to lower yourself by repeating your skew of "supply and demand" vis-a-vis housing density and rent in North Brooklyn, Loisaida, and possibly others. That is, until Brian Paul shot down your argument and called to question your motives by argument of "induced demand"--an axiom more fundamental than "supply and demand" when consideration rightly considers than denies "luxury" upon "value." Otherwise, everything else has been cheap shot, pedantic name-dropping, and skew. You creepily solaced in the "abuse of thesaurus" game, but like "ty from pps" you got handed when your own word choice and parsimony came to count. Please. Stick to the argument, and stop sweating my game, hater: how does one expect and compel a soon displaced resident to cheer his or her own displacement. That is DieHipster's point, brilliant really, a spark of darkness in all that rightist muck DH sometimes swims in. And you're avoiding it by copy-pasting my words onto a word processor, and eyeballing my infelicities.
March 26, 2013, 12:10 pm
Dennis sinneD from Williamsburg says:
And thank you, you are kind, JAZ from Hunting Redbeards. I will look for you and read you in this re/creating Internet mire of our world: Psalm 130.
March 26, 2013, 12:12 pm
eddie from bk says:
This article was picked up by Eater (read by 100's of thousands of people daily) and someone has already commented about how you all are subhuman.

Not really doing a service on the neighborhood, guys.
March 26, 2013, 12:23 pm
eddie from bk says:
This article was picked up by Eater (read by 100's of thousands of people daily) and someone has already commented about how you all are subhuman.

Not really doing a service on the neighborhood, guys.
March 26, 2013, 12:23 pm
anon from williamsburg says:
—— this guy for celebrating the puerto rican and dominican population being pushed out of their neighborhood: “I found a reasonably-priced place in kind of a ghetto block, but it’s changing quickly.”
March 26, 2013, 12:29 pm
Dennis sinneD from Williamsburg says:
And it's really too bad we never went further, if your "cultural superiority" by way of "curiosity" was genuine, that you didn't get the irony of "being an ornament." Your seethe prevents absorption from without, rage overflowing, masking a "hip" exterior pretending apathy. Otherwise, you would've caught that. Guess you're not that sharp, player. Not a true artist. Just a hamster: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simulacrum
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qelippot
March 26, 2013, 12:29 pm
Dennis sinneD from Williamsburg says:
And to eddie and tom, there's a fight going on here, okay? Get out of the way, let me and the bangers handles this, because you're pretense of peace endangers than aids. Save me the "whole neighborhood" is being done a "disservice." [Four dingbats here] your idea of "disservice." You know what's disservice? DISPLACEMENT.
March 26, 2013, 12:31 pm
Dennis sinneD from Williamsburg says:
*your
March 26, 2013, 12:32 pm
Pat I from 70's Brooklyn says:
Die Hipster (and I happen to love his rhetoric) is right. When my friends and I used to go out and get hammered and/or wasted, we hit the classic joints like the White Castle in Fort Hamilton, a 24 hour diner (usually one that had good cheesecake) or the late Rego's Roost on Atlantic Ave.

One guy in our group was a vegetarian, but when it came to the 2AM munchies - the guy was a full blown carnivore - grease, meat, carbs and sugar.

Part of the reason is - your body craves it. The other? You've already done a savage amount of damage to your system. Do you really think Seitan sliders on a vegan bun are gonna undo 4 six packs of beer and various medicinals?

Also - getting a bite to eat was never resulted in a debate. If we were all over the map- food wise we hit a diner. End of story.
March 26, 2013, 12:51 pm
Pat I from 70's Brooklyn says:
Die Hipster (and I happen to love his rhetoric) is right. When my friends and I used to go out and get hammered and/or wasted, we hit the classic joints like the White Castle in Fort Hamilton, a 24 hour diner (usually one that had good cheesecake) or the late Rego's Roost on Atlantic Ave.

One guy in our group was a vegetarian, but when it came to the 2AM munchies - the guy was a full blown carnivore - grease, meat, carbs and sugar.

Part of the reason is - your body craves it. The other? You've already done a savage amount of damage to your system. Do you really think Seitan sliders on a vegan bun are gonna undo 4 six packs of beer and various medicinals?

Also - getting a bite to eat was never resulted in a debate. If we were all over the map- food wise we hit a diner. End of story.
March 26, 2013, 12:51 pm
Dennis sinneD from Williamsburg says:
I skip through too much of the nonsense, but I'll camp on a passage or two. A vignette? He's one of the better writers among us. After all this "entertainment," though, what's left? I guess DH must be satisfied, but beware, that itself corrupts to hip-hamming. And, it's impossible to take seriously all that impugning of dress and taste, though it's equally impossible to avoid any talk of gentrification without measuring them two. Nevertheless, this is where he is exceedingly weak, where he is most "rhetorical." He's much more impressive when he's thoughtful and meaningful. Otherwise, [four dingbats here] all that other nonsense rightist yammering.
March 26, 2013, 12:59 pm
Pat I. from 70's Brooklyn says:
“I hope that it’s going to be a combination of late-night people and people who want a quick, non-pretentious, healthy meal,” said owner Josephine Jansen.

Non-pretentious? C'mon. Look at your customers. You're serving VEGAN Mac n cheese to drunks.

Funny how hipsters can manage to keep up appearances with their diets when plastered but can't manage to not vomit on your stoop at 2AM.

Oh - has anyone here ever gone with a group of people with a bite to eat and one of them was a hipster? It's like throwing bolts into a turbine.
March 26, 2013, 1:02 pm
"Interloper" from Kent Ave says:
I'm at my wits end here...

The stupidity of some of you people, especially diehipster, JAZ and Pat I is astounding.

You automatically assume the whole conversation is set to revolve around hipsters. Never once did the article mention anything about "hipsters inventing anything". Nor did it even mention the clientele of this place. This article is about a new restaurant that will be open late...that's it. You go into the comment section and troll and try and high-jack the conversation. It's a complete joke. There is no actual feedback on substance of the article. Just a complete free for all of douchebaggery.

These d-bags diehipster and JAZ wake up early every day and kick their respective grandmas off of the computer they share in their respective co-ops just so he can be the first to troll articles on Brooklyn Paper.

You're easily some of the most pathetic people I've ever encountered. I am so happy for the doubling and tripling of rents that diehipster mentions. God willing the cycle of gentrification will continue and pricing you out of Brooklyn forever. Afterwards I can only hope that a cost prohibitive luxury highrise will replace whatever sort of co-op hovel you're currently inhabiting that your grandma pays for. You can then move to Staten Island and start trolling the Staten Island Paper...
March 26, 2013, 2:22 pm
Fonty from Greenfont says:
I like your new font. Death to anyone who doesn't!
March 26, 2013, 3:28 pm
Kagetoru from Williamsbury says:
You all forgot to mention that the food at this place sucks.
March 26, 2013, 4:06 pm
diehipster from Slicing Soyboys says:
Lets just all admit it:

There is nothing more that can be written about the hipster invaders than childish arts and crafts, beer, zany foods, and bicycles. And it's written over and over and over and over and over. Don't you hipster defenders get why we keep making fun of it? DON'T YOU? These people are bland and predictable and have raised the price of everything as they pass on through for a couple of years. It's funny how some yup ( i won't mention his name) says he's happy to pay double And triple rent than te norm. Hahahahaha yeah ok - weeeeeeeee know that makes you happy. Nice try nasal boy.
March 26, 2013, 4:52 pm
"Interloper" from Kent Ave says:
If by yuppie you mean a young hard working guy who makes good money and is able to live in a nice place and do nice things then I consider that a compliment.

I am certainly happy to pay more in rent if it means that un-educated, closed minded people like you are priced out of my community. I feel bad for some of the people that get priced out, but punks like you diehipster that just complain about the gentrification and the newer residents are simply intolerable. You have no basis for your hatred other than the fact that we're different than you and we have things you don't. Sorry but life isn't always fair and sometimes people like you are stuck not playing with a full deck.

By the way, you still didn't respond to my challenge of actually putting your money where your mouth is. I dare you to do out on Bedford and pick fights with the people you feel make up the hipster demographic. Put it on YouTube to prove that you did it. Then you'll have credibility. Until then you are and will continue to be a spineless punk.

Once again you've proven yourself to be a complete joke.
March 26, 2013, 4:59 pm
Pat I. from 70's Brooklyn says:
"These d-bags diehipster and JAZ wake up early every day and kick their respective grandmas off of the computer they share in their respective co-ops just so he can be the first to troll articles on Brooklyn Paper."

As opposed to you, Interloper, who kicked your grandmother off the computer at 2:22 PM?

Early day, eh?
March 26, 2013, 6:41 pm
Pat I. from 70's Brooklyn says:
And yes - DieHipster's, JAZ and my assumptions are accurate and correct. Brooklyn didn't know (or want) vegan cuisine until these bearded wet-farts showed up.

C'mon...tell me exactly when vegan cuisine, artisanal cupcakes and organic coffee started showing up.

It wasn't in 1985.
March 26, 2013, 6:45 pm
"Interloper" from Kent Ave says:
Actually Pat my Grandma lives in an assisted living facility that my parents and I split the cost on. I know numbers aren't really your thing..but I personally contribute in the 10s of thousands annually to it. That's probably equivalent to a years salary for somebody with the education and intelligence that you possess. Nice try though.

In 1985 a person couldn't walk down Bedford Ave without tripping over a a heroin needle. That being said...I'll take the artisanal cocktail bars, cheese shops, brunch cafes, coffee shops and boutiques over your antiquated wasteland any day.

I hear Brownsville still has that gritty charm that you seem to love. Let us know where you live and I'll put together a JV with my developer friends to buy up the land around you. We can build a luxury condo building where you sleep that you can't afford. That'll expedite your exodus from Williamsburg real quick. You'll thank me later I'm sure for returning you to your native habitat...until those artisanal cocktail bars, cheese shops, brunch cafes, coffee shops and boutiques start showing up in Brownsville.

Uh oh....
March 26, 2013, 7:49 pm
o3 from bk says:
wonder what dragon meat tastes like?...wait, dont say it...

regardless i wouldnt want to eat while surrounded by people who evidently cant smell their own BO and think nobody else can either.
March 27, 2013, 9:27 am
Chef Alex from Bed-Stuy says:
First of all, the cheese isn't vegan. Who knows where they got that misinformation. Second, those weren't my words, they were the owner's words, which I've already spoken to her about. The locals are my favorite customers. I was born in Brooklyn, but can't afford the neighborhood where I grew up, so I took serious offense to what she said.
March 27, 2013, 9:20 pm
Pat I. from 70's Brooklyn says:

And somehow education/salary comes into it - how? Machinists in the NE corridor can make well over 100K. So do Longshormen. Ask any cop of firefighter what they take home with OT and subsidies. As aopposed to a barista with an MFA making what - 10 bucks an hour?

As far as my intelligence is concerned - well that's subjective. I can't argue at what point Arcade Fire sold out but I can design surgical instruments, implants, aircraft structures, spacecraft, packaging machinery. Last year, I was awarded 2 provisional patents for machinery related to a nuclear reactor operation.. I hold an associates degree. You?

My grandmother was in a home. Somehow I managed to see her after work. I didn't have to contribute anything toward her care because my parents and grandfather - all three with a fifth grade education-managed quite well with the bills.
March 28, 2013, 1:12 pm
Kitty Arberator from . says:
Hi Mom
March 28, 2013, 9:30 pm

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Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.

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