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Foreign CARS dont make sense to me

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GET CASH FOR YOUR CLUNKER. That’s what the letter from a ‘participat­ing dealer’ opened with. I don’t have a clunker but I was curious to see where some of my tax dollars were going, so I read on. I learned a little about CARS, the Consumer Assistance to Recycle and Save Act. I gained some knowledge concerning why and how I could receive a discount of up to $4,500 on a new vehicle. All I have to do to qualify for this government program is to trade in my old clunker (which I don’t have) and bring it, along with this letter to the Toyota Of %u2026.STOP!!! TOYOTA??My government is spending my tax dollars for Americans to buy a TOYOTA? First they spent my dollars to buy General Motors. Now they are spending my tax dollars on a program which permits Americans to buy a foreign car. I admit that Toyota makes better cars but I don’t understand this particular program.One call to the number on the letter and I was connected to Diane, a woman who was very familiar with the program and was obviously prepared for the many calls she received.How come the American government is allowing me to buy an automobile subsidized with American tax dollars that does not have to be American made?

Good question, right? It was apparent that Diane was very well rehearsed with a spoon-fed response for me. I was informed that the Toyota I will buy is really an American car, made in America by American auto workers.

“But, Di. Even though it is assembled here in the United States it is still a Japanese car made by a Japanese company that is located here in America.”

“No, sir. The car you buy from this dealer will be manufactured by the%u2026%­u2026%u2026” and on and on she went.

Unless I can get a better answer to my questions, I am convinced that our reps in the District of Columbia have really lost it. They pass mega-billion dollar bills without reading them. Is CARS one of those bills? Anybody?

The talking heads on MSNBC and CNN are busy telling the world what a marvelous program this is. Maybe so, but it would be a lot better if the bottom line profit went to a struggling American manufacturer.

******

The first round of clunkers information was just released. All of the top ten automobiles traded in for destruction were American made. Of the top ten that were bought by American buyers, six were Japanese. Only one of every five was made by General Motors. Something is wrong here. The fools in Washington are using American taxpayers’ money to buy foreign cars and are happy sending the profits to Tokyo. Didn’t those idiots in Washington think this through?

******

Right now half of Washington is happy helping Japan in this Cash for Clunkers program. I am StanGershbein@Bellsouth.net looking forward to new programs such as Yen for Yachts, Renminbi for Refrigerators, Colon for Cruises, Lire for Lobster, Francs for Filet Mignon, Gelt for Garments and Krona for Cameras%u2­026Japanese, of course.

Updated 11:48 am, January 16, 2019
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