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May 24, 2012 / Brooklyn news / Park Slope / Meadows of Shame

GoogaMooga refund

GoogaBoondoggle: Ticket-holders get refunds after Prospect Park’s festival flop

The Brooklyn Paper
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The Great GoogaMooga didn’t live up to its name — at least for hundreds of “VIP” ticket holders who will get refunds after a not-so-great experience.

Organizers of Prospect Park’s much-hyped food and music festival are giving $250 back to each concert-goer who shelled out for a premium passes as an apology for not providing enough grub and booze on Saturday.

“We’re very sorry if we disappointed you,” event planners said in a statement on Wednesday. “To officially extend our apology, we’re offering you a 100 percent refund.”

Most concert-goers got free passes for the festival, but some paid big bucks for “Extra Mooga” tickets so they could have access to weekend-long food and drink and extra performances and discussions featuring stars such as chef and TV personality Anthony Bourdain and former LCD Soundsystem frontman James Murphy.

But many concert-goers who paid for special bracelets to get into gated-off areas felt not-so-very important when they learned beer lines lasted 45 minutes and that most of the food was gone by 4 pm on Saturday.

“Starving, stranded in the heat, standing on endless lines for food,” wrote one Twitter user.

Another visitor described it as the “biggest letdown.”

“That was the DMV of festivals,” wrote a third.

Superfly Presents, the company in charge, said bummed out “Extra Mooga” buyers have 30 days to collect refunds by e-mailing refunds@googamooga.com.

That pleased some music-loving foodies, who called the refund “a classy move” on the event’s Facebook page.

“Respectable!” wrote concert-goer Pamela Casella Keane. “Better planning for next year!”

Reach reporter Natalie O'Neill at noneill@cnglocal.com or by calling her at (718) 260-4505.

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Reader Feedback

mary from south brooklyn says:
you need a ticket for the free admission section which was accessible from the center drive. pretty easy to get to and didn't affect the park drive at all.
May 24, 2012, 11:11 am
NotGoish from Prospect Heights says:
D-o-u-c-h-e - a - mooga. What a crapshow. The Nethermead is a sea of mud and huge tractor tracks, plus litter everywhere going back to 9th Street, PPW and civilization.
May 24, 2012, 12:47 pm
NotGoish from Prospect Heights says:
D-o-u-c-h-e - a - mooga. What a crapshow. The Nethermead is a sea of mud and huge tractor tracks, plus litter everywhere going back to 9th Street, PPW and civilization.
May 24, 2012, 12:47 pm
Jeannine from Park Slope says:
What a mess. What were they thinking?

Why would they hold an event of that magnitude in that park?
May 24, 2012, 2:11 pm
Clinton Hill Mom from Clinton Hill says:
Hey, the parks are the beaches for the poor. What ever happened to leaving them alone and letting people enjoy open space and nature? Like PP needs another festival...
May 24, 2012, 6:56 pm
JBOB from PS says:
Theyre already talking about next year-they need a full accounting of the damge to the park before theymake any decisions
May 24, 2012, 7:09 pm
Scott from Park Slope says:
Mary, the Flatbush side of the Center Drive was closed. No admission. This was around 2-3pm. Also, if you have to have a ticket, then it's not free admission, is it? You have to plan ahead of time, secure a ticket (even if it doesn't cost you anything), and then go. And, BTW, I checked their website two days before and there was no obvious, "you need a ticket to get your free admission," only "free admission" mentioned in small type. There was, predictably, plenty visible real estate given to Extra Mooga (the $250 option).

You couldn't just wander in. So in effect they still created a private event in a public park that not only did the public not get to attend, but they had to pay dearly to set it up and now have to deal with the damage and clean up afterward.

That stinks.
May 25, 2012, 12:03 pm
ty from pps says:
Scott -- I went. It was not something I'd go to again... but I don't get your "it's not free admission." You would prefer it if they just closed the gates when it was full so you would have no idea if you could go or not? Yes, planning ahead. Really not that tough of a concept.

They damaged the park. That is unacceptable and I hope they aren't allowed to do it again. The litter is nothing, they could just demand the organizers do a better job cleaning up. The real problem is the turf and other things like that. It's not particularly "expensive" to reseed the grass... but it takes MONTHS to repair. The whole season. Unacceptable.

Only relatively low-impact events like the Symphony in the park should be allowed. Minimal equipment and folks (for the most part) take care of their own garbage.
May 26, 2012, 3:15 pm

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