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The Brooklyn Paper enshrined in history! • Brooklyn Paper

The Brooklyn Paper enshrined in history!

New York City Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Cas Holloway slips that day’s issue of The Brooklyn Paper into a time capsule that was later sealed into the wall at the Newtown Creek Sewage Treatment Plant. In 50 years, the capsule will be opened and the public will be amazed at the newspaper’s enduring quality.
Photo by Stefano Giovannini

No one covers Brooklyn like The Brooklyn Paper — so when the city announced that it was planting a time capsule in Greenpoint, our print edition were naturally included.

OK, so this time capsule is in a sewage treatment plant — but who cares? The Newtown Creek Sewage Treatment Plant is a state-of-the-art facility that is so nice, it even has a visitor center.

That waterfall-filled room was packed to capacity on Feb. 11 as Editor Gersh Kuntzman hand-delivered copies of that day’s edition to be secured in a steel box for five decades.

Also included as mid-century must-reads were a copy of Mayor Bloomberg’s PlaNYC blueprint for a more environmentally sound future, plus other documents attesting to the city’s goal of keeping the waterways clean — which is impossible to do because of antiquated pipes that pour human waste into waterways during heavy rains.

“We hope that in the year 2061, no one knows the term ‘combined sewer overflows’ because we succeeded in eliminating them,” said Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Cas Holloway, as he deposited documents into the capsule.

As he put The Brooklyn Paper into the box, he added, “I always save the best for last. I read The Brooklyn Paper every day.”

Students from PS 31 in Greenpoint also added drawings depicting various stages in the water cycle.

Three newspapers — the New York Post, the Daily News, and The New York Times — were included in a 1967 time capsule that was unsealed in 1992, but none of those papers were included this time around.

And there were certainly no printouts from Gothamist.com or Gawker, or Google or any of the newfangled electronic media.

“It’s important to have a newspaper in a time capsule because it provides a snapshot of what was going on,” said Jim Pynn, the plant manager. “And you have such good coupons — not that they’ll still be valid in 50 years.”

Also on hand was Assemblyman Joe Lentol (D–Greenpoint), who has been in office for 39 years. He joked that there’s an outside chance that he’ll still be in the legislature when the time capsule is unearthed in 2061.

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