Turn off the park: W’burgers say no to Spider-Man plan

Sony Pictures is spinning a web of contempt by trying to film “The Amazing Spider-Man 2” in South Williamsburg during Passover, claim angry neighbors who say film trailers shouldn’t take up much-needed parking spaces at the height of the Jewish holiday.

Producers of the movie, starring Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone, have applied to shoot at the Marcy Avenue Armory from March 22 to March 27 and Flushing Avenue’s former Pfizer factory around the same time — but residents of the largely Orthodox community say Passover, which runs from March 25 to April 2, is no time for theatrics.

After all, locals can’t just swing from building to building on a web to get around.

“It’s congested and there is no school and people are shopping,” said Community Board 1 member Simon Weiser. “It would be a hardship in the community.”

Enter Councilman Steve Levin (D–Williamsburg), who is poised to become Spider-Man’s biggest adversary since the Green Goblin.

In a pun-ridden press release that compared movie production companies to ancient Egyptian slaveholders, Levin urged the city to nix Spider-Man’s film permits and “let my people park.”

“Filming of the ‘The Amazing Spider-Man 2’ would be a plague on the streets of South Williamsburg during the sacred holiday, creating a parking struggle of biblical proportions,” said Levin, who wants the community to enjoy its unleavened bread in peace.

Weiser, a member of Community Board 1, asked Spider-Man to be a Spider-Mensch and move production so it wouldn’t coincide with the holiday, but representatives from Sony Pictures said the filming schedule is firm.

Sony spokeswoman Julie Kuehndorf said that the company is willing to work with the city and the community to minimize impact, but she declined to say what steps it would take.

“We’re doing our best to be good neighbors,” she said.

The city said he has not yet decided whether to grant Spider-Man a movie permit.

“The Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment has been and continues to be in close communication with the community and the production to determine the best course of action,” said Marybeth Ihle, a spokeswoman for the department. “Every consideration is taken by our office to accommodate residents observing religious holidays.”

Reach reporter Danielle Furfaro at dfurfaro@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-2511. Follow her at twitter.com/DanielleFurfaro.

Sony Pictures is spinning a web of contempt by trying to film “The Amazing Spider-Man 2” in South Williamsburg during Passover, claim angry neighbors who say film trailers shouldn’t take up much-needed parking spaces at the height of the Jewish holiday.

Producers of the movie, starring Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone, have applied to shoot at the Marcy Avenue Armory from March 22 to March 27 and Flushing Avenue’s former Pfizer factory around the same time — but residents of the largely Orthodox community say Passover, which runs from March 25 to April 2, is no time for theatrics.

After all, locals can’t just swing from building to building on a web to get around.

“It’s congested and there is no school and people are shopping,” said Community Board 1 member Simon Weiser. “It would be a hardship in the community.”

Enter Councilman Steve Levin (D–Williamsburg), who is poised to become Spider-Man’s biggest adversary since the Green Goblin.

In a pun-ridden press release that compared movie production companies to ancient Egyptian slaveholders, Levin urged the city to nix Spider-Man’s film permits and “let my people park.”

“Filming of the ‘The Amazing Spider-Man 2’ would be a plague on the streets of South Williamsburg during the sacred holiday, creating a parking struggle of biblical proportions,” said Levin, who wants the community to enjoy its unleavened bread in peace.

Weiser, a member of Community Board 1, asked Spider-Man to be a Spider-Mensch and move production so it wouldn’t coincide with the holiday, but representatives from Sony Pictures said the filming schedule is firm.

Sony spokeswoman Julie Kuehndorf said that the company is willing to work with the city and the community to minimize impact, but she declined to say what steps it would take.

“We’re doing our best to be good neighbors,” she said.

The city said he has not yet decided whether to grant Spider-Man a movie permit.

“The Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment has been and continues to be in close communication with the community and the production to determine the best course of action,” said Marybeth Ihle, a spokeswoman for the department. “Every consideration is taken by our office to accommodate residents observing religious holidays.”

Reach reporter Danielle Furfaro at dfurfaro@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-2511. Follow her at twitter.com/DanielleFurfaro.

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