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Whipped! Dominatrix fleeing Bed-Stuy dungeon in wake of neighbor’s harrassment campaign • Brooklyn Paper

Whipped! Dominatrix fleeing Bed-Stuy dungeon in wake of neighbor’s harrassment campaign

Mercy!: Dominatrix Charlotte Taillor is looking to move her Quincy Street BDSM dungeon to flee her neighbor’s harassment.
Charlotte Taillor

She’s at the end of her rope!

A local dominatrix is coiling her whips and packing up her paddles as she prepares to flee her Bedford—Stuyvesant neighbor, a woman who vilifies the businesswoman as part of an ongoing harassment campaign, according to the dom.

“She just stays outside screaming, mostly to neighbors, about us, saying things like, ‘They’re kinky weirdos,’ ” said dominatrix Charlotte Taillor. “I told my friends that she’s a humiliatrix, but I don’t have a safe word!”

Charlotte Taillor moved her adults-only classroom, called the Taillor Collective, from nearby Crown Heights to a Quincy Street residential unit between Bedford and Nostrand avenues in December, where she offers paid workshops catering to the sexually adventurous, including lessons on bondage and paddling, cross-dressing events for guys, dirty drawing workshops, and pegging classes for women — a workshop that attracts a disproportionate amount of Jersey girls, the kink maven claimed.

“Housewives from Jersey want to know how to peg their husbands,” Taillor said.

But once her neighbor Laurie Miller found out that the stream of people filing into the building next door visited to study the art of kink, she called the cops, alerted local Councilman Robert Cornegy and Rep. Hakeem Jeffries — neither of whom got back to her, she claimed — and reported the operation to the Department of Buildings, complaining the neighborhood’s residential zoning should be enough to prohibit her Bdsm business.

Miller also organized several meetings of the 200 Quincy St. Block Association to complain about Taillor, most recently convening the group on March 6, where she derided some of the dom’s clients as “creepy” kidnappers.

“It may be a prejudice of mine, but once the activity they have doesn’t get them off anymore, what are they going to do, snatch a kid, or a woman off the street?” she said. “Some of these guys are really creepy looking, that’s what really bothers me.”

Following the meeting, Miller clarified her accusations, telling this newspaper Taillor’s clientele are “transients” and that she doesn’t like to see strangers on her block.

“They’re not people that are regular to our neighborhood,” she said. “You watch who’s who in the neighborhood, and what’s going on, you want to know where they’re coming their from. We really don’t know these people.”

And when asked what specifically made the male patrons she ridiculed “creepy,” Miller pointed to “big afros” and generally “unkempt looking, scruffy individuals.”

Some neighbors stood behind Miller at the recent block-association meeting, including one woman who exclaimed, “But what about the kids?!”

But other Quincy Street residents supported Taillor’s brand of kinky commerce, with another resident admitting she had no idea about the sex business on her block until Miller raised a stink.

“As a neighbor, this sounds like a business I’d be happy to have on this street,” said Rebecca Israel.

City law allows locals to operate home businesses in residential buildings, but require that the property be primarily used as a residence, that at least one occupant work as an employee, and that the business take up no more than a quarter of the overall space, according to Buildings Department spokesman Andrew Rudansky, who said the agency has yet to inspect Taillor’s property.

Still, the dominatrix — whose dilemma was first reported by Patch — is doing everything in her power to break her lease and move, she claimed, including setting up an online fund-raiser to help cover the cost of relocating, which she hopes to do by the end of April.

“We’re taking off, please stop trying to break us, we’re already leaving,” Taillor told Miller at the block-association meeting.

Reach reporter Colin Mixson at cmixson@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-4505.

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