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Median wanted for Carlton Ave.

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The city will lay down a concrete median along a busy Fort Greene avenue this fall, completing a six-month transformation of a thoroughfare that is supposed to make the street safer, but which has, in the interim, made it more perilous for pedestrians, according to one resident.

In May, the Department of Transportation began implementing a Community Board-approved plan to turn Carlton Avenue, between Park and Myrtle avenues, from a one-way speedway into a two-way street. But an integral part of that plan — the concrete median down the center — was left incomplete.

The result, according to Carlton Avenue resident Robert Poles, is a pedestrian nightmare.

“The block continues to suffer speeding, only now two-way speeding,” said Poles.

Poles would rather the city scrap the whole plan and just put down speed humps and more signage.

But, as Ted Timbers, a spokesman for DOT, pointed out, the city’s strategy for the avenue has the support of a broad consensus of the community, Poles excepted.

“The Borough President, the Community Board, elected officials, all are on the same page on this project,” said Timbers. “We’ve got a good consensus here.”

Timbers said the median would be complete by this fall.

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