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Hansel and Gretel meet Bay Ridge.

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“Everyone calls it the Gingerbread House,” said local conservationist Victoria Hofmo. “That house looks just like the Gingerbread House from ‘Hansel and Gretel.’”

It is officially called the Howard E. and Jessie Jones House, after the original owners had architect J. Sarsfield Kennedy build it in 1916.

And its fame stretches across oceans.

“I was traveling in Prague when I came across a display of the most-beautiful places in the United States,” said Hofmo. “I was shocked to see the Gingerbread House was one of the top 10 — in Prague!”

It’s not just beautiful from the outside. This candy-coated dreamhouse is sweet on the inside, too.

A real-estate source familiar with the property told The Stoop this week that the house “has a bowling alley in the basement and a revolving garage door. All they have to do is push a button, and the entire garage floor shifts so they never have to back out.”

He estimated the value of the property at “well over $5 million,” though in reality, it’s probably priceless.

“You just can’t put a value on a home like that,” he said. “It really is Bay Ridge’s best-kept secret.”

The current owners may just want to keep it that way, never answering the door no matter how many times we knocked.

Updated 4:00 pm, November 10, 2010
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Reasonable discourse

Liberetta Bruno from Bensonhurst says:
I use to live about 1/2 mile from this home. My mother would walk us kids in our strollers to the Gingerbread House all the time. As I child I was in awe of this mysterious place,I wondered where was Hanzel and Gretel? Did a mean witch live there? Was it safe to go pass the bushes that lined the property? Could I go to the front door, knock and ask to come in and see this wonderful, magical place? Or would someone open the door and eat me up!
One never knew, and we still don't! I am now 54 years old and still yearn to see the inside. I was back in B'klyn 2 years ago and I could not leave until I went to the Gingerbread House, and when I did I got the feeling of being that little girl standing at the gate wondering what lurked behind that front door.( and I still wonder.) Maybe before I die I will get my life long wish.....to walk inside the Gingerbread House!
by Liberetta Bruno, Treasure Island, Florida
July 17, 2009, 10:53 am
bengee from coney says:
5 mil for a house in Brooklyn.It seems that's about the same price as the rest of the houses in Brooklyn.
Aug. 6, 2012, 8:30 am

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