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To the editor,

After reading your recent online story about the alleged theft of your bike (“Not again! — Gersh’s bike stolen for the third time in 15 months,” Sept. 5), I was just wondering if there’s any possibility that we, not Gersh, are the true victims here?

Is it possible that Gersh’s entire tenure at The Brooklyn Paper has been a giant free bike and insurance scam? Has anyone actually seen Gersh riding (not posing) on a bike? Are we certain that any bikes were actually stolen? And while we’re on the subject, how much taxpayer-funded Medicare did Gersh receive for his “accident”? I never saw any blood — did you?

Before readers send yet another free bike down this rabbit hole, I think we need more details, and proof that Gersh isn’t doing most of his “reporting” from the back of a roomy limousine. Suspiciously yours,

Carlton Goss, Park Slope

Editor’s note: Goss’s letter is riddled with lies, half-truths, libelous assertions, and just plain mean stuff. For one, Goss should ask former Department of Transportation Commissioner Iris Weinshall about the blood that Kuntzman spilled on her at the official opening of the Red Hook Fairway after a crash (Iris would remember). Or he should ask the 84th Precinct, which is in possession of a sworn affidavit from Kuntzman after his second bike theft. Or he should ask the good people of Smith Street, who wave cheerfully almost every morning when Kuntzman pedals past. Unlike Goss, they appreciate the full service and coverage they get from a reporter/editor on wheels.

Tough choice

To the editor,

Your Aug. 13 editorial (“A pol’s kid goes to school — it is an issue!”) completely missed the point.

A parent is fortunate if the right school for their child is the public school for which they are zoned. If not, and you aren’t lucky enough to lottery into the public school that is right for your child, you have a very difficult decision as a parent.

Suggesting that schooling decisions are a fair evaluation of a parent’s character completely ignores all of the factors that go into that decision.

You have favored a complete oversimplification, reducing the issue to a public vs. private school competition. You have done your readers a disservice.

Rebecca Selvenis,

Park Slope

• • •

To the editor,

All this talk about where someones child goes to school is a distraction from issues. Parenting decisions are complex and personal. I am sure that if we looked into any household, someone would find a parenting decision that he disagrees with.

As a parent educator, I resent that a politician would use an opponent’s parenting decision and his child as a pawn in his game. How about at the next candidates forum, we present all the candidates with a list of questions about the decisions they have made for their child including conception, pregnancy, birthing, breastfeeding, family sleeping arrangements, the teaching of speech and reading, sibling relationships, pre-school, etc?

What makes this truly absurd is the fact that a councilmember has no input in the running of the schools. How about the candidates not judge the other candidates on personal choices that they have made?

And how about the editors of newspapers not feeding into this non-productive discussion?

Enough of these foolish attacks!

Lucy Koteen, Fort Greene

Flag burner

To the editor,

Who cares about Southern Comfort — it’s just a corporation (“‘Southern’ Hospitality! Band finds no ‘Comfort’ in cease-and-desist order,” Sept. 12)? But what about the confederate flag in the photo in the article? Many consider that banner a symbol of hate.

According to Anti-Defamation League, “Although the flag is seen by some simply as a symbol of Southern pride, it is often used by racists to represent white domination of African-Americans. The flag remains the subject of controversy because some Southern states still fly it from public buildings or incorporate its design into their state flag.

“The flag is also used by racists as an alternative to the American flag, which they describe as a symbol of the Jewish-controlled government.”

How would Americans feel if a band called “The Third Reich” played in front of the Nazi flag?

Lew Friedman, Park Slope

Seeds are Sohn

To the editor,

I would like to make two corrections to Louise Crawford’s arts section cover story about my new novel, “Prospect Park West” (“It’s fantasyland! — The neighborhood in Sohn’s book ain’t the Slope we know,” Sept. 3).

While employed at the New York Post, I never ogled the penises of local baseball players. I did write a column about the Yankees clubhouse but on my one and only visit there, I was not lucky enough to see Joe Girardi, Derek Jeter or Paul O’Neill in the nude.

Second, I never expressed my opinions on work/life challenges facing modern mothers in my “Mating” column in New York magazine.

I expressed them on my Web site, www.amysohn.com, back in 2006.

Amy Sohn, Park Slope

Bike message

To the editor,

Taking my daily walk on Fifth Avenue, I’ve noticed the lovely, new bike lanes in each direction here in the South Slope (“No pain no lane — crash led to the first real bike lane,” Sept. 15).

I’ve also noticed pro–bike lane articles and comments in your paper and I just wondered if all that clout can now be directed toward getting bikers to follow the law namely, this one, which comes from the motor vehicle code: “Section 1231: Bicyclists are granted all of the rights and are subject to all of the duties as the driver of a motor vehicle.”

As with many things in our society, rights come with those pesky, ignored obligations. Crossing the avenue, not once has a biker even considered stopping for a light as do (most of) their motorized cousins. Check it out for yourselves. I know it twists my knickers.

Barbara Eidinger,

Park Slope

Views on crime

To the editor,

I enjoy reading The Brooklyn Paper online and I particularly enjoy your police blotter — especially the colorful language you use, such as “perps,” “goons,” “dastardly duo” (“Give me the money – or it’s homicide!” Aug. 12).

Keep it up.

Sandra Stokley,

Riverside, Calif.

• • •

To the editor,

Although I appreciate the effort and the information about crime in our borough, I find the mini headlines rather tasteless. It is not appropriate to use “puns” or clever headlines in the police blotter.

These stories are frightening and not a subject to be dealt with lightly.

Liron Unreich, Clinton Hill

Updated 5:14 pm, July 9, 2018
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Reasonable discourse

Fred from South Brooklyn says:
Wow is Lucy Koteen defense! She pretends to be a sincere grassroots neighborhood activist yet her kids went to Packer because she was too chicken sh-t to send them to school in Fort Greene.
Sept. 17, 2009, 10:06 pm
John from Clinton Hills says:
Stupid comment Fred. Are you a parent? Or just some shill for Ratner?

There's nothing wrong with sending your kids to private school. As Michael Moore once said "I'm not sacrificing my kid to make a political point."
Sept. 18, 2009, 3:19 pm

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