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G train safari explores changing borough

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The “G” on this train stands for gentrify.

A renowned architect is giving a G train-centric tour of cutting-edge and controversial new buildings, offering viewers a nuanced glimpse at the way Brooklyn is changing.

The riding-and-walking tour features more than 20 structures near the line’s stations and are hosted by John Hill, author of “Guide to Contemporary New York City Architectu­re.”

“It’s a great way to get out on foot and see the city — and some of the borough’s most striking buildings,” Hill said.

The tour offers fun facts, architectural insights and stories behind structures such as the Barclays Center, the Pratt Institute buildings, and Williamsburg’s Wythe Hotel.

Hill said he planned the tour around the high-profile G train — which was recently at risk of losing a five-stop extension linking north and brownstone Brooklyns — because many of his favorite modern architecture sites are located along the line.

Tour-goers will meet at the Hoyt–Schermerhorn station, ride north then walk to sites, including sleek modern townhouses and a residential building made of shipping crates.

Hill said he chose to showcase Barclays Center, in part because of its rusty looking exterior, public plaza, and “ahead-of-the-curve” design.

And while the metrocard trip isn’t quite like the architecture tours of other cities, like the famed Chicago boat tour or the quaint cable-car rides of San Francisco, Hill, who guided a similar tour along the High Line (in that other borough), said he’d make it worth shelling out $35 to see sites that are normally free in order to learn about some of the city’s most fascinating neighborhoods.

“Brooklyn is such a magnet for culture — and this is a way to see more of it,” he said.

G train tour [160 Schermerhorn St. at Hoyt Street in Downtown, (212) 601– 1000] Aug. 11. $35.

Reach reporter Natalie O'Neill at noneill@cnglocal.com or by calling her at (718) 260-4505.

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Reader Feedback

bobo from ft greene says:
i like small tomatoes when they're taut and firm, but when they're soft and mushy, it just isn't worth the hassle
July 26, 2012, 10:42 am
Pat I from 70's Brooklyn says:
Honestly - is everything an adventure with these self-absorbed twatwaffles? People have been taking the G-Train for years and know suddenly the Zacks and Mollys
want to discover something as utalitarian as the G train?

After reading this the whole cupcake phenom is starting to make a lot of sense.
July 26, 2012, 12:30 pm
Pat I. says:
This guy is not reknown. He got licensure in 2006. he wrote a book and blogs.
July 26, 2012, 12:41 pm
Mickey Shea from Greenpoint says:
I'll pass. I can think of about a trillion better ways to blow
35 bucks.
July 26, 2012, 2:24 pm
Scott from Park Slope says:
"Twatwaffle." Pat, I think you have coined the right term for yourself. Love it. Describes you perfectly. New York is a city full of history, so much that even twatwaffles like you don't realise or appreciate it. I could well imagine you living across the street from JJ Byrne Park and scoffing at anyone who acknowledges the role of the Old Stone House in the middle of it as being the centerpiece of the Battle of Brooklyn, upon which the entire American Revolution hinged. I can imagine you walking down Wall Street, passing Federal Hall, and making rude gestures at other, more educated people, who know that's where George Washington took the oath of office as the first President of the United States. Somebody as myopic as you I can well imagine walking through Battery Park, looking at the battered sculpture there, and thumbing your nose at the people reverently whispering and taking pictures because they know it was the sculpture in the plaza at the World Trade Center on 9/11.

If you can't appreciate, or even acknowledge other Americans' appreciation for the history of our country, then kindly GTFO. Go back to dumbf*istan or wherever it is you're from, and let real Americans explore their history in peace.

You twatwaffle.
July 27, 2012, 10:08 am
Rufus Leaking from BR says:
Can even a guide find the G - Spot?
July 29, 2012, 8:53 am
Scott the Twatwaffle from Park Slope says:
Butterfly in the sky
I can go twice as high
Take a look
It's in a book
A Reading Rainbow

I can go anywhere
Friends to know
And ways to grow
A Reading Rainbow

I can be anything
Take a look
It's in a book
A Reading Rainbow
A Reading Rainbow

Moral is don't pay $35 for a G train safari! Read about it in a book!
Aug. 9, 2012, 4:59 pm

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