Sections

Reynoso, Menchaca, James, and Velazquez rallied for harsher code enforcement

Rabble-house-ers! Pols, activists decry Bushwick slumlords

The Brooklyn Paper
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:

Creating affordable housing is all well and good but the city should also keep existing cheap apartments from going the way of the dodo, said protesters at a march through Bushwick on Sunday.

Mayor DeBlasio’s pledge to build 200,000 new units of affordable housing in the next decade overlooks the fact that landlords are letting rent-regulated buildings rot, and in some cases actively sabotaging them, according to activists who are calling on the city to ramp up code enforcement against slumlords.

“We want to make sure the mayor doesn’t forget about people who already live in places,” said Jose Lopez, an organizer with the immigrant and worker advocacy group Make the Road New York.

The problem of landlords trying to force out tenants is particularly prevalent right now in Bushwick, Lopez said. Demonstrators, including councilmen Antonio Reynoso (D–Bushwick) and Carlos Menchaca (D–Red Hook), Congresswoman Nydia Velazquez (D–Bushwick), and Public Advocate Letitia James, tromped around the rapidly gentrifying neighborhood, stopping at three addresses that they said exemplified the trend.

“The city needs to address the displacement of low-income families by landlords who purposely demolish units in an effort to convert them into market-rate apartments,” Reynoso said. “This is just not right and we are seeing it all over North Brooklyn, especially in Williamsburg and Bushwick.”

The rally and march were the latest in a string of actions by a coalition called Real Affordability for All, assembled to highlight housing issues ahead of the anticipated May 1 release of DeBlasio’s housing plan.

A report by Make the Road New York calls for the city to create stronger incentives for landlords to make repairs, come up with tougher penalties for landlords who violate the building code, and bolster protections for tenants facing dangerous conditions.

— with Danielle Furfaro

Updated 4:24 pm, April 7, 2014
Nathan Tempey is a Deputy Editor at the Community Newspaper Group. Reach him at ntempey@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-4504. Follow him at twitter.com/nathantempey.
Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:

Reasonable discourse

HiDipster says:
Where's Sybil? The people, the people...
April 7, 2014, 6:01 pm
The Chooch from The Bohemian Magic Show says:
Same old same old. Hasn't anyone heard of hiring a plumber, an electrician, a carpenter, paying them to fix the place, docking the cost against your rent, and THEN going to court? In the suburbs we used to call it playing chicken. You've got 12 people now against your landlord, all of them paying to fix the building. Your landlord will slide into debt, to you, and in a few years you'll own the building. Just one item from the Bohemian bag of magic tricks.
April 8, 2014, 8:13 am
Freakinrican from Bushwick/broadway says:
Half my block got brought out. I was the only one left in my building. My heat went off and my apartment was "burglarized" all in November 2013. Took developers to court, almost ended up owning building. Never underestimate a rent regulated apt.
April 8, 2014, 7 pm

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not BrooklynPaper.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to BrooklynPaper.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.

Don’t miss out!

Stay in touch with the stories people are talking about in your neighborhood:

Optional: Help us tailor our newsletters to you!