Sections

Sneak crawls through pizzeria’s air duct

The Brooklyn Paper
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:

78th Precinct

Park Slope

Duct and cover

A covert crook shimmied his way through the air duct of a Vanderbilt Avenue pizzeria on the night of Oct. 29 for $25 and a check.

Employees told police they left the eatery between Prospect and Park places at 11:20 pm, and returned at 9 am the next day to find that somebody had crawled through an empty air-conditioner duct while they were closed.

Nothing was damaged, however, and the small-time thief didn’t make off with more than a few bucks and a check, cops said.

Camera crook

A burglar ransacked a film supply store on Third Street on the night of Oct. 18, taking more than $15,700 worth of electronics.

Workers left the store between Third and Fourth avenues at 11:30 pm, and returned the next morning to find an unlocked window mysteriously ajar. Inside, they found that numerous cameras, computers, lenses, and other miscellaneous items were missing in action, cops said.

Sticky-fingered

A pickpocket pinched a man’s wallet from his jacket on a crowded 3 train at the Atlantic Avenue stop on Oct. 29.

The victim told police he was standing by the train’s door as it pulled into the station near Flatbush Avenue at 8:50 am, when the thief bumped into him on his way off the train. It wasn’t until the doors had closed again that the victim realized his wallet had vanished along with the sticky fingered crook, cops said.

Balding bandit

A thief looted a locked case in a Flatbush Avenue pharmacy on Oct. 29 — taking more than $1,200 worth of hair growth formula for men.

Surveillance footage shows the man inside the drug store at 8:40 pm, when he used a key to gain access to a 240-day supply of Rogaine, cops said.

Bad bikers

Two bike-born bandits snatched the cellphone out of a man’s hands on Seventh Avenue on Oct. 29.

The victim told police that he was near Garfield Place at 10:30 pm, when the crooks swooped past on their bicycles, and deftly nabbed the phone out his hands, before riding off into the night.

Push over

A raider snuck into a man’s Butler Street apartment on Oct. 29 for his laptop.

The victim told police that he left his home between Fourth Avenue and Gregory Place at 6:30 pm, and he returned at around 11:55 to find his computer was gone.

When the victim filed a report, he told police that the lock on his front door is no good and can be easily pushed open, cops said.

Sleeping bag

A crook nabbed a bag off a sleeping woman on a 2 train at Flatbush Avenue on Oct. 26.

The victim told police that she was near Grand Army Plaza at 2 am and nodded off to sleep. She woke up about a half hour later to find her pocketbook, which contained her wallet, laptop, Social Security card, and birth certificate was missing, cops said.

— Colin Mixson

Posted 12:00 am, November 11, 2015
Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:

Reasonable discourse

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not BrooklynPaper.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to BrooklynPaper.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.

Don’t miss out!

Stay in touch with the stories people are talking about in your neighborhood:

Optional: Help us tailor our newsletters to you!