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Kids learn about activism at Cadman Plaza Park

for Brooklyn Paper
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Photo gallery

1/4
Standing up for what is right: Oliver and Izzy Morris make their voices heard.
2/4
Speaking out in various ways: Zoe Katasas shows off her guitar-playing talents at the march.
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Rain drops keep falling on my head: Scott Chinn, along with his family Katie Irish and Desmond Chin, show off their signs.
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Soaking it all in: Tom Breloft indulges the rain with his kid at the march.

It was their privilege to attend.

One of the nation’s oldest social justice institutions brought parents and children together at Cadman Plaza Saturday to teach the younglings about the importance of speaking out.

“This was a way for kids to learn what it means to have their voices heard in a group,” said Scott Chinn. who brought his wife, three-year-old son, and infant child to the Youth Empowerment March hosted by the New York Society of Ethical Culture

Speakers touted the importance of children learning at a young age that they can and should speak out, and that by binding together, they can make the world a better place.

Chinn said he took his son to the event to get him to start flexing the activism muscle at an early age — even if the boy couldn’t quite figure out exactly what was going on.

“For him at his age, it’s just really fun to be around a lot of people, but as he gets older, he’s going to learn more about what it means and as he develops his own ideas about things, he’ll understand the deeper importance of it.”

And one dad, who drove down from Connecticut to attend the March, also believes it will impact his 10-year-old daughter’s life going forward.

“To actually be able to participate in something that was aimed specifically at her. I think could put a little power in her and make her feel like she was part of something that might lead to actual change,” said Oliver Morris. “When kids start doing things like this early, they tend to continue doing things such as being involved and being activists.”

Updated 4:52 pm, May 17, 2017
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Reasonable discourse

under your spell-checker says:
Is Candman Plaza Park anywhere near Fort Green Park, about which BP had a story a week or so ago?
May 17, 2017, 12:54 pm
Homey from Crooklyn says:
Brainwashing children.....child abuse
May 17, 2017, 1:45 pm
Blah says:
How to have your parents force their opinions on you, and claim it's you expressing yourself!
Ethical??? Ha ha ha!!!
May 17, 2017, 5:57 pm
petey from Sunsetpark says:
Brainwashing at it's finest! A true measure of a good fascist dictatorship.
May 18, 2017, 12:21 pm
Marge from Clinton Hill says:
Why can't children be left to be children? Will there be kiddy classes for making paper mache genitals hats to wear in hate Trump marches? A three year old with a ladies genitals on his head would be a great start on a life of relentless upper middle class "resistance."
May 19, 2017, 11:09 am

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