Planned G’point building will overcrowd G train, schools, critics say

A Greenpoint businessman wants to turn his pool hall into an eight-story apartment building — but neighbors say the still-sleepy area can’t accommodate the hundreds of new residents a development that size will attract.

Building owner Paul Pullo is trying to convince the city to change zoning rules so he can build a 140-unit complex with a 90-car parking lot and retail space at McGuinness Boulevard and Calyer Street.

The proposed apartments will cater to couples and young families — and bring much-needed below-market-rate housing to the gas station-and-warehouse-dotted area, he said.

But neighbors fear the planned building will crowd nearby streets, subway stations and schools.

Neighbor Joanna Nowakowski said PS 34 and the Greenpoint Avenue subway station might not be able to handle all those new residents.

“The G train is already only four cars long — and it’s normally full,” she said. “[The project] affects a lot of things.”

She added construction could crack century-old buildings behind the building and bring too much car traffic to surrounding streets.

Developers must now convince the Department of City Planning to change the manufacturing-zoned space to residential — a move that would put the lot in line with the rest of the block.

Pullo says he will work with neighbors to combat problems, should they arise, and that transportation won’t likely be one of them.

“There’s a bus stop nearby and we’ll have extra bike racks,” he said. “I don’t think it will be an issue.”

Reach reporter Natalie O'Neill at noneill@cnglocal.com or by calling her at (718) 260-4505.

A Greenpoint businessman wants to turn his pool hall into an eight-story apartment building — but neighbors say the still-sleepy area can’t accommodate the hundreds of new residents a development that size will attract.

Building owner Paul Pullo is trying to convince the city to change zoning rules so he can build a 140-unit complex with a 90-car parking lot and retail space at McGuinness Boulevard and Calyer Street.

The proposed apartments will cater to couples and young families — and bring much-needed below-market-rate housing to the gas station-and-warehouse-dotted area, he said.

But neighbors fear the planned building will crowd nearby streets, subway stations and schools.

Neighbor Joanna Nowakowski said PS 34 and the Greenpoint Avenue subway station might not be able to handle all those new residents.

“The G train is already only four cars long — and it’s normally full,” she said. “[The project] affects a lot of things.”

She added construction could crack century-old buildings behind the building and bring too much car traffic to surrounding streets.

Developers must now convince the Department of City Planning to change the manufacturing-zoned space to residential — a move that would put the lot in line with the rest of the block.

Pullo says he will work with neighbors to combat problems, should they arise, and that transportation won’t likely be one of them.

“There’s a bus stop nearby and we’ll have extra bike racks,” he said. “I don’t think it will be an issue.”

Reach reporter Natalie O'Neill at noneill@cnglocal.com or by calling her at (718) 260-4505.

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